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Cardiac Arrest aged 47

On 23rd February 2019 I was competing in the Rottnest Channel Swim (Western Australia). This is a 19.7km open water swimming event. I was competing in a duo i.e. you rotate time in and out of the water. I had done the event in a group of 4 six times and was keen to do something a bit more challenging. My partner and I swim all year round and train in the pool and the ocean. We were both very fit and well prepared. I have no memory of the swim at all but my crew reports that about 1/2 way through the event I started to talk about "not feeling right". They checked for the usual concerns in open water swimming - especially hypothermia but my symptoms did not match. At the 16km point my team rested me and let my partner swim. The final 500m of the swim is usually done together so that you can cross the line and celebrate. This is what we did on the day.

My story

My new birthday is October 28, 2015.
At the time of my event, I was 55 years old. I was an active runner who enjoyed participating in multiple 5k races throughout the year. In the year before my event, I had taken up swimming as my son, who was in his second year of college, had been a high school swimmer. I thought swimming would be less wear and tear on my joints. My usual routine was to swim three days a week and run three days a week; this kept me fit although I always had about ten pounds to lose. I did have high blood pressure for which I took medication. I also had somewhat high cholesterol for which I did nothing as I did not like the body aches associated with the medication.
In the days/week leading up to 10/28/15 I had developed a head cold. On October 27, 2015 I decided to go out for a run on my usual course. As I was heading back I remember seeing my wife's car drive off from our house on her way to work. Just a usual day except the head cold.

Delirium after cardiac arrest

Hi, my sister had a cardiac arrest after a half marathon 6 weeks ago. She’s been doing really well, but she’s still pretty confused. Her main issues are her short term memory but what is disturbing her more are thoughts that her children have died or she has cancer. It’s quite hard to convince her otherwise and is distressing for her. Did anyone else experience this sort of thing and what did you find helpful with memory retraining? Many Thanks Rebecca

My Husband Emotional and Psychological effects from his cardiac arrest

My husband suffered a sudden cardiac arrest on March 12, 2019 after his doctor sent him to the pharmacy without even doing a EKG. He collapsed and faceplanted as he walked into the Pharmacy. Luckily, the fire station was right next to the pharmacy and the pharmacist was there pretty quickly. En route they did shock my husband twice to get his heart started. After a Face and Head CT scan showed no brain hemmorrage they were able to put three stents in the right side of his heart. They did give him hypothermia treatment as well after the surgery. He remained in a coma with five fractures in his face for 11 days and a total of 14 days in the ICU and step down before two weeks at a Rehabilitation hospital. He was given a life vest for three months of monitoring which was removed June 28th, 2019. Per his cardiologist, no defibrillator needs to be put in at this time.

A Class Act: Remembering Jim Page

It's hard to believe James O. Page left us 15 years ago (September 4, 2004). Jim was a visionary leader who became known as the "Father of EMS." He took me under his wing at the Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation and the Journal of Emergency Medical Services many years ago. I will always remember him for his passion for saving lives from sudden cardiac arrest, which, in the end, took his life. I hope that in some small way we are honoring his memory with the work we are doing today at the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation--still working to make survival the rule, rather than the exception. ~Mary Newman

See attachment.

Hiking with defib/pacemaker after aborted sudden cardiac arrest

On March 7, 2019, I was hiking alone in Frozen Head State Park in Tennessee. I just finished climbing a tough 2.5 mile section of the trail and was about .5 miles from the trailhead (with a road near it). Suddenly, my heart began that fast pounding and my breathing turned very labored. I leaned over my poles and waited for this to stop. Previously, I had episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia and figured this was more of the same. I was wrong. It did not stop. I clawed at my neck thinking something was caught and then tried to get my pack off with the same thought. I could not unsnap the pack- it was too difficult for some reason. My bladder let lose and then I knew sustained VT would kill me. Becoming an observer (I am academia)- I thought, "I will be the first sibling to die" and "Now I know how I would die." It was very confusing at that point. Tried to sit down and somehow ended up lying in the cold mud of the trail on my left side.

My SCA Event

This post is from a caregivers account of my SCA, sudden cardiac arrest.

On June 29th, 2019 my wife retired to the bedroom earlier than usual while I stayed up to watch the local late news. At some point shortly before midnight I made my way to our bedroom. I woke my wife and informed her that I was having a heart attack and that we needed to go to the ER. She promptly got dressed and took me to the hospital. Luckily it was quicker for her to take me than wait for an ambulance as we live five minutes away from the ER. The doctor told her if we had waited I would not be here.

Is RVLM (Medulla) safety mandatory for life?

In SCA and many critical conditions death ensues the loss of blood pressure due to RVLM debacle.

To save life should we safeguard first RVLM and secondarily the brain and thirdly the heart?

Brugada

Hi All, my youngest son had his first sca a year and a half ago. It was very traumatic but he survived. He was diagnosed with Brugada Syndrome and has had a defib fitted. We began to feel that he was then infallible but last Sunday he had another episode and the defib shocked him twice to bring him back round.
He is 26 and I was wondering if there are any other people here who have or are going through the same ordeal who would be willing to talk to us about the way they are dealing with emotions surrounding living with this condition.
With thanks

The Law Protects AED Rescuers

By Steve Tannenbaum

Did you know that the law actually encourages lay people and bystanders to perform CPR and to use an AED on people who have suffered from sudden cardiac arrest and that it actually protects them from litigation?

Traditionally, the public has been concerned about performing CPR and using an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) due to fears of hurting the victim and potentially incurring liability. Neither of these two fears are accurate or true. A person who has just suffered from a sudden cardiac arrest is clinically dead. It is not possible to cause further injury to such a victim by performing CPR or by using an AED.

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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