SCA News

SCA News

Apple’s iOS 12 Securely and Automatically Shares Emergency Location with 911

NASHVILLE, TN--iPhone users in the United States who call 911 will be able to automatically and securely share their location data with first responders beginning later this year with iOS 12, providing faster and more accurate information to help reduce emergency response times.
 
Approximately 80 percent of 911 calls today come from mobile devices, but outdated, landline-era infrastructure often makes it difficult for 911 centers to quickly and accurately obtain a mobile caller’s location.

Studying Heart Disease After Death Can Help the Living

Study Highlights:
  • Autopsy findings provide valuable information about causes and natural history of overall cardiovascular disease.
  • Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis.

DALLAS, TX--Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Deaths from Cardiac Arrest Are Misclassified, Overestimated

Nearly 1 in 7 Are Due to a Hidden Drug Overdose, UCSF Autopsy Study Finds

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--Forty percent of deaths attributed to cardiac arrest are not sudden or unexpected, and nearly half of the remainder are not arrhythmic – the only situation in which CPR and defibrillators are effective – according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco and the City and County of San Francisco Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

Drowning Can Be Fast and Silent, But It Can Be Prevented, Too

Just back from a run with her husband, Laura Metro faced a parent’s worst nightmare: Her 6-year-old daughter, Maison, ran to her screaming, “I think Clay died! I think Clay died!”

Metro’s 3-year-old son, who was swimming with family friends, was found at the bottom of the pool with his towel. One friend started CPR – or the closest thing he knew based on what he’d seen on TV – on Clay’s blue, lifeless body.

Paramedics arrived and got Clay’s heart beating again. He was taken by helicopter to the hospital and spent two days in a coma before making what Metro calls “nothing short of a miraculous recovery.”

Paul F. Pendergast Joins Board of Directors

PITTSBURGH, PA--Paul F. Pendergast has been elected to serve on the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Board of Directors. He previously chaired the Board in the organization’s infancy.

Pendergast works in private practice as a management consultant specializing in sales, marketing and business development, dealing primarily with business development opportunities for non-profit clients, and medium to very large for-profit companies, hospitals and institutions of higher learning. He also serves as Director of Client Relations at Alchemi, LLC, and as a consultant to Theia Satellite Network.

Erectile Dysfunction Means Increased Risk for Heart Disease, Including Cardiac Arrest, Regardless of Other Risk Factors

Study Highlights:
  • Men with erectile dysfunction are at greater risk for heart attacks, cardiac arrests, strokes and sudden cardiac death.
  • New study provides strongest link to date between sexual dysfunction and cardiovascular risk.
  • Erectile dysfunction can be an important factor for physicians in gauging cardiovascular risk.
  • Men with erectile dysfunction warrant further testing and more aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors.

DALLAS, TX--Erectile dysfunction (ED) indicates greater cardiovascular risk, regardless of other risk factors, such as cholesterol, smoking and high blood pressure, according new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Drones May Soon Help Save People in Cardiac Arrest

Drones, the unmanned aircraft that got its start as part of the U.S. military’s arsenal and is today being used by everyone from photographers to farmers, are now heralded as a solution to a problem that’s bedeviled emergency medical personnel for years: How to deliver lifesaving defibrillators to people suffering cardiac arrest in areas not quickly reached by ambulances.

Scientists Unravel Brain Networks of Cardiac Arrest Survivors

Immediate CPR can double or triple the likelihood that a person will survive cardiac arrest, but survivors often face struggles, particularly with their brains.

Dr. Karen Hirsch, a neurologist and program director of neurocritical care at the Stanford Stroke Center, is researching how to best treat patients’ brains post-cardiac arrest. She recently completed work on a study funded by the American Heart Association in which she and a team of researchers uncovered important connections in the brain of comatose patients that might help doctors know how best to treat them.

Lifesaving Information Is Not Always a Phone Call Away

Keidryn Nimsgern’s heart stopped when she was riding in her boyfriend’s car while the two ran errands in a suburb of Madison, Wisconsin. Jake Suter had never called 911 before that frightening day a year ago.

Today, they are both grateful there was a dispatcher trained to give instructions in CPR on the other end of the line. But not every distraught caller dialing for emergency help can find the same kind of help. There is no uniform standard or training across the country.

Timing Resuscitation Compressions Using the Song 'La Macarena' or a Smartphone App Improve Compression Quality

New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark shows that the quality of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be improved by using either a smartphone app or by using the song "La Macarena" as a mental memory aid.

The study is by Professor Enrique Carrero Cardenal and colleagues at the University of Barcelona, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, and Universitat Autònoma Barcelona, Spain.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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