SCA News

SCA News

Using Epinephrine to Treat Cardiac Arrest: Minimal Benefit, Increased Risk of Brain Damage

WARWICK, UK--A clinical trial of the use of epinephrine (adrenaline) in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest. The research raises important questions about the future use of epinephrine in such cases and will necessitate debate among healthcare professionals, patients and the public.

iBeat Heart Watch Detecting Cardiac Arrest, Is Now Available

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--iBeat, a health tech company empowering people to live longer, today announced the release and shipping of its iBeat Heart Watch – a heart and blood flow monitoring smartwatch that will engage the user and can notify first responders for immediate medical aid if something appears to be wrong.

Long-Term Survival Worse for Black Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

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Key Discovery Made in Genetic Make-Up of Heart Condition Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

A new study published in Circulation, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association and led by a cardiologist at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre at Toronto General Hospital has found evidence that only one of the 21 genes normally associated with Brugada Syndrome, a serious genetic heart condition associated with the risk of sudden arrhythmic death, is a definitive cause of the condition.

ICD Placements Not Meeting Medicare Coverage Criteria Decline After Investigation into Potential Overuse Announced

NCDR ICD Registry data show 16.1 percent decline in year after DOJ begins investigation

Following the announcement of a U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) investigation into potential overuse of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) that did not meet the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) National Coverage Determination criteria, the number of ICDs placed not meeting the criteria declined, according to a study of hospitals participating in the NCDR ICD Registry.

In 2005, CMS created a National Coverage Determination for ICDs, which incorporated the available clinical evidence and aligned payment practices for primary prevention ICDs in patients insured under Medicare.  

Wearable Defibrillators Are a Safe and Effective Alternative to ICDs in Certain Pediatric Heart Patients

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Onsite Defibrillators Helping to Increase Cardiac Arrest Survival

The use of onsite automated external defibrillators (AED), increasingly found in places like airports and sports stadiums, is raising the chances of surviving a cardiac arrest, suggests a recent study from Europe.

Between 2008 and 2013 in regions of Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden, the proportion of patients experiencing cardiac arrest outside of a hospital who had a dose of electric current delivered to the heart by emergency medical services dropped by half, researchers found. At the same time, the proportion that received this treatment, known as defibrillation, from bystanders or first responders such as firefighters or police more than doubled.

On average, patients got shocks to restore their heart rhythm sooner than was typical in the past and there was an overall increase in survival over the study period, from 13 percent to 15 percent.

CPR Is Key to Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation increases the possibility of surviving sudden cardiac arrest. But it’s not just trained professionals who can jump in to perform CPR. There are simple, life-saving steps any bystander can take.

“We think it should be a basic life skill,” such as knowing to call 911 when there’s a fire, said Dr. Clifton Callaway, a professor and executive vice chair of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.

He gives this simple guidance: If someone is unconscious and does not appear to be breathing properly, it’s time to start CPR chest compressions.

Improved CPR Training Could Save More Lives, Research Finds

American Heart Association Scientific Statement addresses gaps in training that lead to flat survival rates for cardiac arrest victims

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Gene Editing Technology May Improve Accuracy of Predicting Individuals’ Heart Disease Risk

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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