SCA News

SCA News

Flirtey and City of Reno Receive FAA Approval for Drone Delivery Beyond Visual Line of Sight

Approval will allow Flirtey to deliver automated external defibrillators

AED Readiness Project Aims to Improve Access to AEDs

Sudden cardiac arrest—when the heart suddenly stops beating—is a public health crisis. About 1,000 cardiac arrests occur outside hospitals every day in the U.S. and only one in 10 victims survives. Most cases (70 percent) occur in the home.[1]

Survival largely depends on immediate bystander intervention with CPR and automated external defibrillators (AEDs). AEDs are layperson-friendly lifesaving devices that can restore a normal heartbeat when used promptly. With quick CPR and AED action, five in 10 victims could be saved.

Are Thrill-Seekers With Heart Conditions Playing With Danger?

The fastest roller coasters exceed 100 mph. A race car driver can double that speed within seconds.

Either activity can exhilarate, but could they also harm the heart? Could someone literally die from the excitement?

Probably not, according to one study that surveyed thrill-seekers with serious heart conditions.

Despite all the warning notices posted on adrenaline-pumping amusement park rides, or from friends trying to discourage that skydiving trip, very little science has explored the question.

"I can't think of a single major replicated study connecting thrill-seeking personalities and actual thrill-seeking behavior to health. That is, one that does the full cardiovascular workup," said Frank Farley, a psychologist at Temple University in Philadelphia.

Sudden Cardiac Deaths in Young People

An article on "Sudden Cardiac Deaths in Young People" written by the Children's Health Defense team and republished on this site, has been pulled due to its implications that vaccines may cause cardiac arrest in young people. The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation does not support this claim, which is not supported by science. We apologize for any confusion.

 

On-Screen CPR: Heart-Stopping Drama Doesn't Always Reflect Reality

When we watch movies and TV, we know that people can't actually fly, zombies aren't real and animals can't talk, among other scenarios presented for our entertainment.

So when CPR and other heroic measures to revive an unconscious victim pop up on the screen, should we react the same way?

"Movies very rarely get it right," said Dr. Howie Mell, an emergency room physician in suburban Chicago who has also been a firefighter and paramedic. "They need to create drama and tell a story in a succinct and cohesive manner. That doesn't always lend itself to an accurate portrayal."

Many health professionals wish that were different. Several studies in recent years have compared on-screen cardiac crises to reality and lamented the results.

50th Person Saved with an AED at Hawaii Airports

Richard Schmidt, 76, was just about to board his flight home to Sacramento after a two-week vacation here last month when his heart suddenly stopped and he collapsed at the jetway at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.

That’s when several passengers behind him, including a nurse and off-duty Honolulu firefighter, went into action. Feeling no pulse, they started CPR and used an airport automated external defibrillator, or AED, to shock his heart. After a single shock, Schmidt regained consciousness and was rushed to Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center where he had triple bypass heart surgery on Jan. 24. Following his recovery, he met one of the good Samaritans face-to-face at a news conference today before boarding his flight back home.

70,000 Additional Lives Saved: The Potential of Immediate Bystander Action

An annual report from the American Heart Association indicates the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest occurring outside hospitals in the U.S. remains high and survival rates remain low. Bystander intervention—a key determinant of survival—also remains low. The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation urges the public to learn CPR and how to use automated external defibrillators (AEDs), since immediate bystander action can triple the chance of survival. And, since most cases outside hospitals occur in the home, chances are bystanders will be called upon to help save their loved ones.

Obesity, Other Risks Play Large Role in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Among the Young

Research Spanning More Than a Decade Points to Importance of Screening for Risk Factors Earlier in Life

LOS ANGELES, CA--Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found.

While sports activity often garners attention in cases of sudden cardiac arrest in younger patients, it was cited only in a small percentage of those ages 5 to 34 in the study, published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association.

Latest AHA Statistics on Cardiac Arrest Survival Reveal Little Progress

The annual report indicates the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the U.S. remains high and survival remains low. Bystander intervention in the U.S. also remains low. In 2017, laypersons initiated CPR in 39% of cases, used AEDs in just 6% of cases, and delivered a shock in ~2% of cases, based on CARES data.

Call-Push-Shock Partners Urge the Public to Remember to Call, Push, and Shock When Sudden Cardiac Arrest Occurs

To help save more lives threatened by sudden cardiac arrest, Parent Heart Watch and the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, along with multiple partners, urge the public to learn CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED) during Heart Month this February.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a public health crisis— affecting more than 356,000 people outside hospitals each year, including over 7,000 youth under age 18—but death can be averted if people nearby act quickly. Today, only one in 10 victims survives, but with immediate CPR and use of an AED, survival rates can triple.

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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