SCA News

SCA News

National ICD Registry Reports Few Complications with Implantation of Internal Defibrillators

Some Implanting Physicians Lack Formal Training

September 7, 2007­–WASHINGTON–First the good news: First year data from the National ICD Registry indicates few complications with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs). Now the bad news: A number of implanting physicians had no formal training with the medical procedure. The report will be published in the September 2007 edition of Heart Rhythm the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

The registry, the nation’s first comprehensive database of detailed information about patients with the implantable medical devices, found that complications at the time of device implantation and prior to hospital discharge occurred at a 3.6 percent rate in the more than 108,000 ICD implantations at 1,117 hospitals. Adverse events included hematomas (1.2 percent), lead dislodgement (1.0 percent) and death (0.02 percent).

Low Risk of Infection with ICDs

September 5, 2007­–DALLAS–Device-related infections developed in fewer than 1% of patients within a year of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation, according to a study to be published in the September 18th issue of Circulation (published online on August 27th). The Prospective Evaluation of Pacemaker Lead Endocarditis (PEOPLE) study of 6,000+ patients in 44 medical centers in France found that the risk was lowest among patients receiving a device for the first time and patients who were given antibiotic prophylaxis. People who had a fever 24 hours before the implantation procedure were more likely to develop infections.

New CPR Promises Better Results by Compressing Abdomen, Not Chest

Leslie Geddes, the Showalter Distinguished Professor Emeritus in Purdue's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, demonstrates a new technique for performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The method promises to be more effective than standard CPR because it increases nourishing blood flow through the heart by 25 percent. Geddes has developed the new method, called “only rhythmic abdominal compression,” or OAC-CPR, which works by pushing on the abdomen instead of the chest. (Purdue News Service photo/ David Umberger)

ISSA Requires Personal Trainers to Undergo AED Training

May 29, 2007 – CARPINTERIA, CA – The International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA), a teaching institution and certification agency for fitness trainers, will require all U.S. students who enroll in a certification course after June 1, 2007 to provide evidence they have successfully completed training in the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in addition to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. Though AED training is not required for students who enroll prior to June 1, 2007 or for international students, ISSA strongly recommends that these students also seek CPR-AED training.

First Statewide PAD Program Launched in Nevada

April 20, 2007 – RENO, NV– Leading local health organizations in the State of Nevada have announced the formation of Nevada Project Heartbeat, the first statewide Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) program in the United States.

Nevada Project Heartbeat’s goal is to improve Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) survivability in the State of Nevada. It aims to accomplish this goal by raising the average citizen’s awareness of SCA, and by providing places of business, public agencies, and other organizations with the tools and training needed to make Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) available, accessible, and affordable.

FDA: Routine Follow-Up Important for Patients Affected by ICD Recall

April 11, 2007 – Boston Scientific/Guidant has recalled approximately 73,000 Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICDs) and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillators (CRT-Ds). A faulty component in these devices can cause the batteries to use energy sooner than expected.

“No patients have been harmed, however some devices have required early replacement,” said William Young, Vice President, Reliability and Quality Assurance at Boston Scientific, Cardiac Rhythm Management, in an April 5th letter to patients.

Penn Study: ICDs Improve Quality of Life for Heart Patients

Patients Should Be Optimistic About Return to Normal Life After Surgery

 

April 11, 2007 – PHILADELPHIA –Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Medicine have discovered that implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) -- electric monitoring devices that deliver a lifesaving shock in the event of a cardiac arrest -- help patients with heart problems live longer, more active lives. Further, the study found most patients living with ICDs enjoy a quality of life consistent with average Americans their age and have a high level of satisfaction with the device, offsetting longstanding perceptions that the technology extends but seriously impairs patients’ lives. Peter Groeneveld, MD, MS , Assistant Professor of General Internal Medicine and his co-authors report their findings in the April 2007 issue of the journal Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology.

 

Use of Vending Machines to Dispense AEDs

April 11, 2007 – Tokyo - According to an article by Alice Dordenker in The Japan Times, automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are now available in vending machines across Japan. “This interesting innovation is just one of the ways in which Japan is leading the world in AED deployment, after years of being far behind,” she says.

Her report states that AED placement is increasing rapidly in Japan, ever since rules were changed in July 2004 to allow laypersons to use AEDs. About 45,000 AEDs were placed in Japan in 2006, according to cardiologist Dr. Hideo Mitamura, AED advocate.

St. Margaret Foundation and PULSE Join Forces to Save More Lives in Pittsburgh

New Collaborative Retains PULSE Name, Extends Coverage Across Southwest PA

April 8, 2007 – PITTSBURGH –St. Margaret Foundation expanded its established leadership role in providing Automated External Defibrillators (AED) throughout the region as a result of its alliance with PULSE – Pittsburgh United for Life-Saving Emergencies.

The Value of Being Prepared

April 6, 2007 – DALLAS –March 1, 2007, was supposed to be just another day for Gretchen Minchew. As a business coach, her meeting with clients was business as usual. However, one meeting on this day would change her life; Minchew suffered a sudden-death heart attack.

Minchew's day included three meetings, two new clients, and dinner with her husband, which would take her from 7 a.m. to early evening. What didn't enter her plans was that her life would be saved by an automated external defibrillator (AED), a skilled nurse, and three Boy Scouts of America employees.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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