The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation is dedicated to bringing you the latest news and developments in sudden cardiac arrest prevention and treatment.

Are you or someone you know struggling to adjust after surviving sudden cardiac arrest?

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation is working with New York Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University Department of Psychiatry on research related to the aftermath of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survival. The study was originally restricted to survivors in the tri-state region, but has now been expanded. Researchers at New York State… Read More

Study finds benefits of COVID-19 vaccination outweigh risks of rare cases of myocarditis

Research Highlights: New analysis indicates the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccine outweigh the risks of developing myocarditis, a rare heart condition that has been reported at a higher prevalence than expected among some people who received either the Pfizer or Moderna COVID mRNA vaccine. Researchers reviewed data from U.S. Centers of Disease… Read More

Chipping in to help save lives

The “Chip In for Sudden Cardiac Arrest” golf tournament on June 5th at Innisbrook in Palm Harbor, Florida, was a great success. “This year's tournament raised a total of $31,018.32 for the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation and the American Heart Association – Florida,” said Kaitlin Ryan, who, together with her family, organized the tournament to… Read More

​​​​​​​Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation urges public awareness and action after collapse of Danish soccer player, Christian Eriksen

PITTSBURGH, PA -- Danish soccer player Christian Eriksen, 29, recently suffered sudden cardiac arrest during a competition in Copenhagen. Fortunately, bystanders immediately provided CPR and defibrillation to restore his heart to a normal rhythm.  The world was watching when Christian Eriksen, 29, a Danish midfielder, suffered sudden cardiac… Read More

AAP issues new policy: Incorporate cardiac risk screening for all youths at least every 3 years

All children should be screened for the risk of cardiac arrest regardless of their athletic status, according to the updated American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement Sudden Death in the Young: Information for the Primary Care Provider. The policy, from the AAP Section on Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery and the Pediatric &… Read More

Denmark sees surge in 'heart runners' after Eriksen's cardiac arrest

COPENHAGEN--The cardiac arrest suffered by Denmark midfielder Christian Eriksen during a Euro 2020 match has seen a seven-fold increase in sign-ups for the “heart runner” app, which allows emergency services to quickly direct citizen responders to assist heart attack victims. Eriksen’s life was saved when CPR was administered to him on the pitch… Read More

Recovery an important link in Chain of Survival for cardiac arrest survivors, caregivers

The world watched last Saturday as Danish soccer player Christian Eriksen suffered a sudden cardiac arrest on the field during the Euro 2020 tournament. The quick action of his teammates, doctors and first responders who performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on Eriksen immediately, and, then used an automated external defibrillator (AED)… Read More

If it can happen to a professional athlete, it can happen to anyone

SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS--“It was a chilling sight for anyone who saw it,” said Professor Stephan Achenbach, president of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), the world’s largest organization of heart doctors. Christian Eriksen, a 29-year-old football player for Denmark, suddenly collapsed on the pitch in front of tens of thousands of spectators in… Read More

SCA Foundation representatives interviewed by Wisconsin Public Radio

"Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of death in the U.S.—and it is not the same as a heart attack," says Wisconsin Public Radio. Larry Meiller, host of WPR's The Larry Meiller Show, today interviewed Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation representatives Mary M. Newman, MS, President & CEO, and William J. Brady, MD, Board Member. They… Read More

Smart watches could detect risk of sudden cardiac death – and save lives

Currently patients must undergo hospital tests to determine if they are at risk, but researchers believe new technology could make detection far easier. Smart watches could soon be saving lives by warning their wearers they are at risk of sudden cardiac death. Researchers at UCL and Queen Mary, University of London have developed an algorithm to… Read More