timbers1's blog

timbers1's blog

Another great SCA Survival Story

This is a very short post, but I came across this story today and thought it was worth sharing. While these types of stories aren't uncommon, I guess I appreciated the simple advice of getting CPR training. Obviously, it was awesome to hear about the successful outcome. I haven't had to go through that type of experience, but I can imagine how I would feel if I had to work through that with my spouse and then they returned healthy. So good and worth a share!

http://abc13.com/health/newlywed-saves-husbands-life-after-sudden-cardia...

A reminder on AED Maintenance

I recently came across this story--http://globalnews.ca/news/3613170/winnipeg-woman-speaks-out-after-husbands-heart-stops-aed-malfunctions/ the ran through details regarding an SCA event that took place in just the last week or two.

Essentially, an off-duty fireman spending time with his family and some colleagues of his was hit with an attack that dropped him immediately. While he couldn't have really asked for better company to face such an event in his life (after all, how many are "lucky"--and I use the word loosely--enough to have a cardiac event in the presence of trained EMT's?), not everything went as smooth as possible in this type of emergency. Namely, the AED at the family entertainment spot where he was visiting wasn't working despite being present. Obviously, a non-working unit is no better than not having one at all.

Monophasic vs. Biphasic Defibrillators

I was recently studying this article covering monophasic vs. biphasic technology in AED units and was struck by a few interesting points:

1) First defib type shock that saved a life took place all the way back in the 1940's and used metal spoons!
2) The biphasic tech allows for significantly less shock (joules) to be used in treatment do to the waveform.
3) The lower-level of required shock is what has allowed for the size of AEDs to shrink.
4) Multiple biphasic waveforms exist and are used by different manufacturers (per this article),

St. Louis AED Program

I recently came across this article on the Cardiac Science website that gave some background on the success St. Louis has had in developing a strong PAD (public access defibrillation) program. While the article is a number of years old at this point, I took a number of interesting nuggets from it.

Gaining ground on AED comfort

While participating in a recent forum discussion in which a member suggested adding AEDs to public transport vehicles, I was driven to an article on Mass Transit Mag (here) that covered that exact topic. It was interesting to learn just how far we've come in making AEDs more available, but also how far we still have to go.

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