Heart2Good's blog

Heart2Good's blog

Shift happens

Last week I drove to NY to see my old buddy Dr Rubin, electrophysiologist supremo. He's just the best darn doctor I've ever had the pleasure to be a patient of. Well, it turns out that that I finally made some use of my ICD (Medtronic Virtuoso). It's the second ICD I've had - it replaced the first one after its battery was running dry. I had this one implanted in July 2010 and it has a new feature called ATP (Anti Tachycardia Pacing) which is pain free therapy that is delivered if the device detects a VT.

On July 17 and October 20, the device did just that. Both times I was in a stressful situation (giving an important talk with an audience). And both times though I knew I was nervous (lots of palpitations), I did not, repeat, not, notice that the device operated. I'm very thankful for this ATP thing which supposedly can stop VF from occurring.

Could he have been an angel?

This article is the story of a man who recently collapsed on the sidewalk in Manhattan, suffering a Sudden Cardiac Arrest, and was given CPR by an unknown bystander. During the commotion when the ambulance arrived with the defibrillator, the stranger disappeared. The man survived his SCA, but the man who did the CPR was not to be found. Could he have been one of those beings who walks among us that are in this world but not of this world?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/15/jason-kroft-seeks-good-samarita...

- Carolyn
SCA Survivor and believer in angels

A Decade Extra

Ten years ago today, I collapsed with ventricular fibrillation. I owe my life to Tom and Randy who performed CPR on me during a training class in a hotel in Dallas. They thought of giving up in the 12 minutes or so it took for the ambulance to arrive with a defibrillator. I'm glad they did not stop. Because of their efforts, and the fine work of the EMTs, I've gained ten more years of life that I would not have had.

I'm so grateful for the work of all involved - Tom, Randy, the EMTs, the doctors and nurses at the hospital. And for the last ten years, the ongoing care of the electrophysiologists, especially Dr Rubin. I'm also thankful that I have a wonderful husband who took excellent care of me following my SCA and during my recovery. Through him, I know and experience love each day.

I thank God for all the people who are willing to perform bystander CPR and for all the research and technology about how to save the life of someone experiencing SCA.

A tragic reminder of the National CPR/AED week, could Tim Russert have been saved?

 Many newspapers ran stories about the first annual National CPR/AED week. Congress set aside the first week in June to spotlight how lives can be saved if more Americans know CPR and how to use an AED (a defibrillator).

Now we have many stories of the tragedy of a high profile public figure struck down by cardiac arrest that may have been prevented through the availability and use of an AED. Details may be forthcoming, but the story so far is that Tim Russert did receive bystander CPR, but no defibrillation until the EMTs arrived some minutes after his collapse. This is all too common a situation and causes hundreds of deaths per day across the country.

Could Tim’s demise help us to save someone else? It’s all too easy, Call 9-1-1, and start CPR. Ask someone to get an AED, and then use it. They are simple and safe, even a child can do it.

A Heart Too Good to Die

Jeremy has published a book called A Heart Too Good to Die - A shocking story of Sudden Cardiac Arrest This suspenseful true story of modern day reanimation shares the shock and grief of life's fragility. It also describes, in layman's terms, the medicine of survival and the miracles required. It is an enticing and easily read story of a serious medical emergency, covering the emotions and issues of sudden cardiac arrest as well as providing relevant factual/clinical details. Foreword by David. A. Rubin, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. www.heart2good.com Some of the praise received so far...

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