Bob Trenkamp's blog

Bob Trenkamp's blog

MICR still paying off

Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates Triple For Ariz. FD
STAFF EXPLORER NEWSPAPER
THE EXPLORER (TUCSON, ARIZONA)
CREATED: DECEMBER 11, 2012

Survival rates have more than tripled for cardiac arrest patients in the Northwest Fire District (NWFD) as a result of a new treatment protocol and a close partnership with the University of Arizona Medical Center.

(see article at http://www.firehouse.com/news/10840863/cardiac-arrest-survival-rates-tri...)

Essentially, the overall survival rate has gone from 4.9% to 14.6% for all arrests and from 11.1% to 37.5% for witnessed arrests.

This builds on the MICR work Bobrow et al. published in JAMA in March 2008.
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=181606

Another piece of the compelling case...

see:

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/126/24/2844.full.pdf+html

The results of a Japanese study was published in today's issue of circulation.

The study showed that there is a significant advantage to the victim of an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest when the rescuers use compression-only CPR.

Be safe.

Are you a gambler?

If you see an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest happen - and there's a 14% chance that you will at least once in your lifetime - and if we're not trained, that person will likely stay dead or be brought back with brain damage, just because you wouldn't spend a few hours every two years learning what to do when you see a cardiac arrest happen. There's more than an 80% chance that that victim will be a family member, a friend, or an acquaintance.

What you're really saying when you don't get trained is that you're willing to take an 11% chance that the family member, friend, or acquaintance you see die will stay dead.

Can you live with that?

...From the JournalGazette.net

It's remarkable that he made it back with that long a delay before defibrillation.

Published: December 6, 2012 3:00 a.m.
HANDS-ONLY CPR, AND LUCKY TIMING, SAVED HIS LIFE
Frank Gray
Tuesday night, Patrick Carpenter finally got to see the hat that saved his life.

Blueprint for an airport

If you are one of the 376 airports in the U.S.A. and don't have a program like this, here are the instructions:
__________________

On October 17, a woman and her husband were on their way to the United Airlines ticket counter in Terminal 2 when the woman began experiencing difficulty breathing and collapsed. A United Customer Service Agent immediately began assisting and called out for anyone who knew CPR. A nurse practitioner was in the airport and rushed over. The United employee then called for assistance and found Airport Police Officer Eric Davis. Officer Davis immediately responded by grabbing an AED. Both the nurse practitioner and Officer Davis placed the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) on the woman and administered it. The woman then began breathing on her own, and all stayed with her until a rescue crew from the Phoenix Fire Department arrived on-scene. The woman was stabilized for transport to a local hospital.

This is the way it's supposed to happen, most of the time.

Player, 14, saved by coach's CPR training, automated external defibrillator
By Associated Press

Knoxville Central High School freshman Hunter Helton had sudden cardiac arrest during a conditioning practice Monday.

According to The Knoxville News Sentinel (http://bit.ly/SClyvb), coach Jon Higgins, -- a former University of Tennessee player -- performed the rescue protocol on Hunter and used the AED to stabilize his heartbeat. The youth is a cousin to Colorado Rockies first baseman Todd Helton, a former UT standout. Todd Helton also played prep ball at Central High School.

Hunter's father said the boy had no history of heart problems.

"He's had poison ivy and braces -- that's all," Ronnie Helton said. "He's always been a healthy, normal kid."

But thinking back to Monday evening and what doctors told him, Ronnie Helton still gets emotional.
"He flatlined three times," he said, choking back tears.

North Carolina Joins the Sweeping Trend.

North Carolina has passed a law requiring CPR training for graduation from High School.

WAY TO GO!

There are now a handful of states who require CPR training before graduation, and the pace is accelerating, largely due to the AHA's activist role in encouraging states to adopt such legislation.

The number continues to grow. Way to go, AHA!

They are getting with the program...

First two paragraphs form focal Chicago report about Chicago Marathon: The successful defibrillation was treated almost with a yawn. That's super because it means that (a) there was a defibrillator on scene and there is a growing expectation that it will be there and used.

Bob

"Marathon runner suffers cardiac arrest but fewer rushed to hospitals

"BY MITCH DUDEK, DALE BOWMAN, FRANCINE KNOWLES AND STEFANO ESPOSITO Staff Reporters October 7, 2012 7:30AM

"One man suffered cardiac arrest in the last miles of the race, but cool weather kept injuries down in this year’s Bank of American Chicago Marathon, race officials said. The cool weather provided nearly ideal conditions for runners, and the men’s winner broke the course record.

Check out this save!

The LA Times carried a story about an attorney who arrested and was saved by his staff members. See
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-1007-lopez-cpr-20121007,0,83773....

Each of us as more than a ten percent chance of seeing - at least once in our lifetime - a family member, a friend, or an associate die of a cardiac arrest. When that happens, the victim is clinically dead, and will almost certainly stay dead unless someone sees that person die, calls 911, begins CPR, and - if one is available - promptly defibrillates the victim's heart with an AED.

When one of the possible outcomes of an event (for example, a cardiac arrest) is, in your mind, truly unacceptable, you need to view the odds of that happening as being 100% and prepare to deal with it when the arrest happens.

They don't always work, but at least they are starting to show up on the sideline

High school football player dies after collapsing during game

WYFF Greenville

Rouse was given CPR and shocked with a defibrillator before the ambulance arrived to take him to the hospital. Players and coaches from both sides prayed as medical personnel tended to Rouse. Hartsville was hosting Crestwood.

_______________________

It's tragic that this player died, but not all sudden cardiac arrest victims come back. The positive aspect of this tragedy is that the authorities had an AED at the game. Ten years ago, you would have had a very difficult time finding an AED at a high school sports event.

Either they had an AED at the field and the reporter did not mention it, or....

Here's the logic flow: If an MD was doing CPR, it was because the student had suffered an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. If the student was in the ER, awaiting transfer to an appropriate hospital, an AED was used on him, because it's extremely rare that someone's heart will spontaneously resume beating when treated only with CPR. If an AED was used at the scene before EMS arrived, there's a really good chance that the child will survive with major brain functions intact. If they had to wait for the ambulance to arrive and use their defibrillator, the odds of a good outcome are a lot lower. There's no way to tell from the story whether or not there was an AED on scene, but the story does give us an opportunity to reflect that there should always be an AED at every athletic match or practice. The article starts below.

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