Posted by Bob Trenkamp on 09/11/2014

Two factors determine the size of a risk:

  1. How likely is it that the thing you're concerned about will happen?
  2. And if it happens, how large is the loss?
  • "one chance in a million that you'll lose a leg" is not a big risk.
  • "a 50 / 50 chance that you'll lose a penny" is not a big risk.

How big a risk is a ten percent chance that you'll see a family member or friend die of a cardiac arrest and not know exactly what to do about it?

Each of us will see - at least once in our lifetime - a family member or friend or someone we know die of a cardiac arrest. And whether that person gets brought back with their brain intact will be significantly determined by whether you know what to do and do it quickly.

Your odds of seeing a stranger arrest are ten times smaller - unless you watch a lot of TV.

In real life, seventy percent of all arrests happen in the home. That's why it's really important that you learn CPR, stroke recognition, and how to fix a choking incident.

But this isn't the most import thing: what percentage of the time are you in a situation where nobody with you? The most important thing is that all the people you spend time with know how to perform CPR, fix a choking incident, and recognize when you are having a stroke.

Why don't you do something about that now? Once you've watched those clips, make sure those people you spend time with watch them, too.

Comments

Submitted by Bob Trenkamp on 09/04/2015

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"One in ten of" should have preceded "Each of us will see - at least once in our lifetime - a family member or friend or someone we know...." [My proofreading problem. sorry.]

"In real life, seventy percent of all arrests happen in the home...." On the same day I posted the note above Chan, McNally, et al. had a paper accepted by Circulation that changed the "seventy" to "eighty-five."