Archive - 2019 - SCA Article

Archive - 2019 - SCA Article

February 4th

Study: Intense Exercise to Strengthen Heart and Lungs May Help People Live Longer and Better

The goal of exercise shouldn’t be to simply move. Rather, individuals should ramp up the intensity to improve heart and lung fitness and live longer, says a new Ball State University study.

Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Mortality in Healthy Men and Women, an analysis of 4,137 adults, found that mortality risks decline when cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) levels increase in healthy men and women, said Matt Harber, director of Ball State’s Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory. This is the first time a study has directly measured CRF in both men and women rather than relying on estimates.

Higher Lifetime Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death Among African Americans May Be Associated with Income and Education Disparities

Study Highlights:

  • African Americans have a much higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death than whites, especially among women. The lifetime risk was double overall and three times higher in African American women compared to white women.
  • Disparities in income and education, as well as hypertension, diabetes, and other risk factors, accounted for much of the difference in risk.

DALLAS, TX--African Americans – especially African American women – have a significantly higher risk of sudden cardiac death during their lifetime than whites, and much of the disparity can be attributed to income and education levels, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

January 31st

Cardiovascular Diseases Affect Nearly Half of American Adults, Statistics Show

DALLAS, TX--Nearly half of all U.S. adults have some type of cardiovascular disease, a percentage that reflects recently updated guidelines for treating high blood pressure, according to a new report. High blood pressure – also known as hypertension – can lead to heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

"We're becoming more and more aware of the importance of high blood pressure. Levels we used to think were normal we now associate with worse outcomes, and treating them makes a big difference," said Dr. Emelia J. Benjamin, a professor of cardiology at Boston University and chair of the group that wrote the American Heart Association's "Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2019 Update".

January 23rd

Cardiac Arrest Survival Summit: Call for Presentations Now Open

The Citizen CPR Foundation is proud to host the Cardiac Arrest Survival Summit (CASSummit)—the new ECCU—December 10-13, with pre-conference workshops on the 9th and 10th at the Hyatt Regency in Seattle, WA. Interested parties are invited to submit presentations to the conference, which is devoted to improving sudden cardiac arrest survival rates worldwide.

The CASSummit is dedicated to facilitating:

First Statewide Study Shows More Cardiac Arrests Due to Opioid Overdoses

PHOENIX, AZ--An increasing proportion of all cardiac arrests occurring outside of the hospital are related to drug overdoses, according to a new study conducted by two University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix students.

Fourth-year medical student Gabriella Smith and second-year medical student Sam Beger co-authored a manuscript showing that 15 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest every day in Arizona and two of those are related to opioid overdose. This was the first statewide study to show trends in overdose-related, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Smith and Beger worked on the study beginning in spring 2017 with Bentley Bobrow, MD, associate director of the Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center – Phoenix and professor of emergency medicine at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson. Their research was published online this week in the journal Resuscitation.

Philips and the AHA Join Together to Increase Global Survival Rates of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

The Philips and American Heart Association Connected Pulse Program first-of-a kind initiative, combines education, training and technology for an integrated customized solution in major metropolitan areas around the world

January 22nd

Survey Reveals Nearly Two Thirds of Americans are Not Confident They Know How to Operate an AED

CINCINNATI, OH--More than 3 in 5 Americans doubt their ability to correctly use an automated external defibrillator, while slightly more than half say they are proficient in performing CPR, according to the results of a recent survey.

In the survey of more than 2,000 adults, conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of workplace first aid services and supplies provider Cintas Corp., 63 percent of respondents reported a lack of confidence in using an AED, and only 54 percent said they felt comfortable administering CPR.

Another Day at the Office--Thanks to an AED

On National Wear Red Day in 2018, few people at the Nashville law firm Lewis, Thomason, King, Krieg & Waldrop took notice of the occasion, which calls attention to heart disease being the No. 1 killer of women.

"I think we had forgotten about it being that day," said Tania Freeman, the firm's business development officer.

Still, Feb. 2, 2018, turned out to be a day many of them would never forget, especially Tania and John Lewis.

January 21st

Regional Cardiac Arrest Centers Increase Odds of Survival

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death and some hospitals are equipped to play leading role in care.

Key Takeaways

  • Regional cardiac arrest centers would feature hospitals with robust care such as adequate staffing of cardiology, neurology, and critical care teams.
  • In a regional approach to cardiac arrest care, patients treated at the top regional hospitals had a 27% decrease in hazard of death.
  • Diverse teams of clinicians are needed to treat cardiac arrest patients.

Cardiac arrest patients would benefit from a regionalized system of care similar to tiered trauma centers, recent research indicates.

January 7th

Fluctuating Personal Income May Be Associated With An Increased Heart Disease Risk

DALLAS, TX--Sudden, unpredictable drops in personal income during young adulthood are associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease and/or dying from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In the United States, the recent rise in income inequality suggests that a larger proportion of the population faces poverty and economic difficulties. In addition, while most people experience some income change, income volatility has been on the rise and has reached a record high level since 1980.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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