Archive - 2018 - SCA Article

Archive - 2018 - SCA Article

August 20th

Ageing Overweight Scuba Divers at Risk of Underwater Cardiac Events

SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS, FRANCE--Older, overweight scuba divers are being urged to shed pounds to avoid an underwater cardiac event. That’s the advice from a large study in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a publication of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1
 

“Cardiac issues are now a leading factor in diving fatalities,” said study author Peter Buzzacott, MD, of the University of Western Australia, in Crawley, Australia. “Divers who learned to dive years ago and who are now old and overweight, with high blood pressure and high cholesterol, are at increased risk of dying.”

August 8th

British Heart Foundation Joins Forces with Microsoft and National Health Service to Save Thousands More Lives from Cardiac Arrest

Thousands more lives could be saved from cardiac arrests, thanks to a ground-breaking partnership between the NHS, the British Heart Foundation (BHF), and Microsoft. The new partnership aims to map all of the UK’s defibrillators, with a shared ambition for the life-saving devices to be made readily available for every out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

The initiative is in response to shocking figures that show public access defibrillators are used in less than three per cent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, significantly reducing the survival chances of tens of thousands of people every year.

August 7th

No Easy Answers on Best Heart Check-Up for Young Athletes

Screening aside, health authorities agree that defibrillators need to be within easy reach at sports practices and games and other public venues .

WASHINGTON, DC--What kind of heart check-up do young athletes need to make the team? A large study of teenage soccer players in England found in-depth screening didn't detect signs of trouble in some athletes who later died — yet allowed others at risk to get treated and back in the game.

At issue is cardiac arrest, when the heart abruptly stops beating...How to find the young athletes most at risk before a collapse is hotly debated: Do they need routine EKGs added to their pre-sports check-ups? The American Heart Association doesn't recommend it, but European guidelines do.

Screening Fails to Predict Most Heart Deaths in Young Soccer Players

Examinations of more than 11,000 adolescent soccer players in the UK over 20 years have found that routine heart testing prevented very few sudden heart-related deaths during exercise.

One in 266 players were found to have a heart problem that might cause sudden death. One in 1,396 died suddenly from some form of heart disease, totaling eight cases. But six of those eight athletes had passed the one-time heart screening, which used both electrocardiograms (ECGs) and ultrasound.

The cost of screening: $3.8 million or $342 per teenager from 1996 through 2016. The cost of identifying any child with heart disease: $16,167 per case.

July 27th

HeartBeat NOLA Launched to Help Save Lives in New Orleans

New Orleans area musician and sudden cardiac arrest survivor with his wife launch non-profit HeartBeat NOLA.

REDMOND, WA--New Orleans area musician and sudden cardiac arrest survivor, Maurice Trosclair (“Miracle Meaux”), along with his wife Nancy Trosclair, have launched a new, life-saving initiative to benefit the Greater New Orleans Area. Trosclair was a guest at Physio-Control's 3rd quarter kickoff event in Redmond, Washington. In his address, he shared his story of survival and thanked the staff of Physio-Control, manufacturers of the Lucas 3 Chest Compression System, a mechanical device that helped save his life after his sudden cardiac arrest on February 14, 2017.

July 25th

Resuscitation Leaders Call for Paradigm Shift to CPR Competency to Save 50,000 Additional Lives Each Year by 2025

The American Heart Association and Laerdal Medical convene nation’s 30 largest health care systems to drive a new standard of patient care

July 19th

New Study Says Taking a Vacation Could Improve Your Health

Have you been feeling unhealthy lately? A vacation could be the best medicine.

Researchers say what many have long believed to be true: Some time away may actually reduce stress.

The gold standard of long term health studies, the Framingham Heart Study, which tracked workers over 20 years, found vacations can be important for your physical health.

According to the study, men who didn’t take vacations were 30 percent more likely to have a heart attack, and for women who don’t take a break, the chance of a heart attack went up to 50 percent.

(Heart attacks sometimes lead to cardiac arrest.)

Researchers also find that vacations improve mental health and overall well-being.

July 17th

Using Epinephrine to Treat Cardiac Arrest: Minimal Benefit, Increased Risk of Brain Damage

WARWICK, UK--A clinical trial of the use of epinephrine (adrenaline) in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest. The research raises important questions about the future use of epinephrine in such cases and will necessitate debate among healthcare professionals, patients and the public.

July 10th

iBeat Heart Watch Detecting Cardiac Arrest, Is Now Available

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--iBeat, a health tech company empowering people to live longer, today announced the release and shipping of its iBeat Heart Watch – a heart and blood flow monitoring smartwatch that will engage the user and can notify first responders for immediate medical aid if something appears to be wrong.

July 9th

Long-Term Survival Worse for Black Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Study Highlights:

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