Archive - Jan 2017 - SCA Article

Archive - Jan 2017 - SCA Article

Date
Type

January 26th

AHA Releases Latest Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

DALLAS, TX -- There are more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) annually in the U.S., nearly 90% of them fatal, according to the American Heart Association’s newly released Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2017 Update. According to the report, the annual incidence of EMS-assessed non-traumatic OHCA in 2015 is estimated to be 356,500. Estimates also suggest 7,037 children suffer OHCA each year.[1]

January 25th

Getting To The Heart Of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Olympic skater shares his heart-stopping experience and what you should know about new implantable heart devices

Even a fit and healthy professional athlete can suffer from sudden cardiac arrest—but a look at Olympic skater Paul Wylie’s story may help to shed some light on what you need to know about the latest advancements in implantable heart devices that protect against sudden cardiac arrest and treat other irregular heart rhythms.

January 23rd

Two Treatments Yield Similar Outcomes in Children After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

No differences in neurobehavioral function between children in two temperature treatment groups a year after suffering from cardiac arrest in a hospital setting

ANN ARBOR, MI -- Emergency body cooling does not improve survival or functional outcomes in children who experience in-hospital cardiac arrest any more than normal temperature control, according to a multicenter study led by the University of Michigan and University of Utah.

Whole body cooling (therapeutic hypothermia) involves strictly controlled lowering of a patient's body temperature below the normal range in hopes of reducing brain injury.

Current guidelines recommend using either therapeutic hypothermia or actively maintaining body temperature within the normal range. Researchers found that both treatments helped control fever and led to similar outcomes in young patients.

January 22nd

Texas Two Step: Save A Life Campaign 2017

Dr. Oz joins medical school students and others to save lives by teaching free, Hands-Only CPR during weekend event in 11 Texas cities

January 18th

Olympic Athletes Have Heart Problems, Too

Some Olympic athletes could be at risk while training and competing because of heart defects or dysfunction that they may not even know about, Italian researchers say.

About 4 percent of the Italian athletes studied over a 10-year period with MRI and CT scans as well as electrocardiograms (ECG) had cardiovascular disorders – a higher proportion than researchers expected to find.

“Even though it’s a small percentage with abnormalities, the implications can be huge,” said lead author Dr. Antonio Pelliccia, scientific director of the Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian National Olympic Committee in Rome. “Athletes may be healthy, but they may not be safe from certain risks such as sudden death syndrome.”

International Organizations Endorse AMSSM Position Statement on Cardiovascular Screening

International Organizations Endorse AMSSM Position Statement on Cardiovascular Screening

LEAWOOD, KS -- Multiple international medical societies have endorsed the "AMSSM Position Statement on Cardiovascular Preparticipation Screening in Athletes: Current Evidence, Knowledge Gaps, Recommendations and Future Directions."

Researchers Find That Electrical Function May Be Restored In Damaged Heart Tissue

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA--A Dalhousie Medical School researcher has discovered that scar tissue, like that caused by a heart attack, can maintain electrical function in damaged regions of the heart.

January 16th

NCDR Study Shows High Survival Rate For Elderly Patients With ICDs

Almost 80 percent of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia survived two years, according to a study published Jan. 16 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Frederick A. Masoudi, MD, MSPH, FACC, and colleagues used data from ACC’s ICD Registry to examine 12,420 Medicare beneficiaries undergoing an ICD implantation after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal ventricular arrhythmia, between 2006 and 2009 in almost 1,000 U.S. hospitals.

January 12th

Physio-Control Launches Voluntary Field Action for LIFEPAK 1000 Defibrillator

REDMOND, WA--Physio-Control announced today that the company is launching a voluntary field action for the LIFEPAK 1000 defibrillator due to reported instances where the device has shut down unexpectedly during patient treatment.

January 10th

AHA and Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters Launch Hands-Only CPR Training Kiosk at McCormick Place

CHICAGO, IL -- Visitors to Chicago's McCormick Place Convention Center can learn to save a life in just five minutes.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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