Archive - Sep 2012 - SCA Article

Archive - Sep 2012 - SCA Article

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September 27th

FDA Approves First Subcutaneous Heart Defibrillator

Photo courtesy of Boston ScientificThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a heart defibrillator that helps to restore regular heart rhythms with leads that can be implanted just under the skin (subcutaneously) instead of connected directly into the heart. An implantable defibrillator is a small battery-powered device that constantly monitors a person’s heart rhythm and can deliver a therapeutic dose of electricity to restore the rhythm when it senses the heart is beating dangerously fast (tachycardia) or chaotically (sudden cardiac arrest). 

September 25th

Psychological Support Vital for ICD Patients

Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder are common among people with implanted heart defibrillators, but improved patient education and ongoing psychological support can help them cope.

That's the message in a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) restores normal heart rhythm and prevents sudden cardiac death.

"A shock from an ICD can be lifesaving, but it can also affect a person's quality of life and psychological state," statement writing group chair Sandra Dunbar said in an AHA news release. "It's important to look at this issue now because 10,000 people have an ICD implanted each month. They range from older people with severe heart failure to healthy children who have a gene that increases the risk of sudden cardiac arrest."

You Can Make a Difference: Help Raise Awareness on October 3

Donate to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation through PIttsburgh Gives on October 3 and The Pittsburgh Foundation will provide additional funding

PITTSBURGH, PA--In 2008, Congress declared October "National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month." Now, four years--and more than a million deaths later--many people still do not understand that sudden cardiac arrest, which differs from a heart attack, affects more than 1,000 people each day, and on average, fewer than 1 in 10 victims survive. 

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, a national 501(c)3 charitable organization based in Pittsburgh, is working diligently to change this dynamic.

September 20th

Thin Placenta Might Be Linked to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Later in Life

 

Reduced nutrients, impaired development of fetus may raise risk in adulthood, study suggests.

Being born to a mother with a thin placenta -- the organ that nourishes the fetus -- may increase the chances of developing sudden cardiac death as an adult, new research suggests.

"People [born to mothers] with the thinnest placentas were twice as likely to have sudden cardiac death," said study author Dr. David Barker, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Oregon Health & Science University.

The report is published online Sept. 19 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Up to 5 million people a year worldwide die of sudden cardiac death, according to study background information.

September 4th

Study: Prolonged CPR May Be Beneficial

When a hospital patient goes into cardiac arrest, one of the most difficult questions facing the medical team is how long to continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Now a new study involving hundreds of hospitals suggests that many doctors may be giving up too soon.

The study found that patients have a better chance of surviving in hospitals that persist with CPR for just nine minutes longer, on average, than hospitals where efforts are halted earlier.

There are no clear, evidence-based guidelines for how long to continue CPR efforts.

The findings challenge conventional medical thinking, which holds that prolonged resuscitation for hospitalized patients is usually futile because when patients do survive, they often suffer permanent neurological damage. To the contrary, the researchers found that patients who survived prolonged CPR and left the hospital fared as well as those who were quickly resuscitated.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

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Wexford, PA 15090

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