Archive - 2016 - Campaign Article

Archive - 2016 - Campaign Article

September 29th

American Heart Association Publishes Policy Statement Advocating for Cardiac Emergency Response Plans in K-12

Only four states mandate school planning for cardiac arrest although 7,000 children annually have out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

September 26th

California to Provide CPR Training to Most Students

DALLAS TX--Over the weekend, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill that will require CPR training for a majority of the state’s high school students.

Although the California law falls short of the American Heart Association’s efforts to get states to provide CPR training to all high school graduates, AHA volunteers cheered the new law, which will result in about 270,000 of the 377,000 California high school graduates each year being trained in CPR.

“So many lives have been saved because of the heroic act of bystanders who performed CPR,” cardiothoracic surgeon Kathy Magliato, M.D., said in a news release.

“With CPR in Schools, we have the opportunity to create a generation in which teens and young adults in California are trained in CPR as part of their health education and prepared to save lives,” said Magliato, an AHA Western States Affiliate board member.

Calif. Governor Signs Bill to Provide CPR Training in High Schools

SACRAMENTO, CA--Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 1719 to teach cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in schools into law. The new law, authored by Assemblymember Freddie Rodriguez (D-Pomona), makes California the 35th state to provide CPR training in high schools, along with Washington, D.C.
 
“As an Emergency Medical Technician for over 30 years, I know that CPR is one of the most important life skills a person can have,” said Assemblymember Rodriguez (D-Pomona), author of AB 1719. “By teaching CPR in high school, we are sending students into the world with essential, life-saving skills.”
 
High schools that require a course in health education for graduation will begin to offer instruction in performing CPR in the 2018-2019 school year. Students can be taught the fundamental life-saving skill of hands-only CPR in 30 minutes or less.

September 8th

Pitt's Athlete Heart Testing Could Spark National Attention

When it was revealed eight days ago that two Pitt football players, freshmen Zack Gilbert and George Hill, would be forced to sit out after being diagnosed with heart conditions, the news was met with an outpouring of disappointment, grief and empathy for two athletes whose respective careers were suddenly in jeopardy or, worse, over before they even could begin.

With that agony, however, came an undercurrent of relief. As awful as this is, the sentiment went, thankfully it was discovered before it was too late, that it was identified through a series of tests instead of an autopsy.

Had either player attended a different school, their ailments might have remained undetected. Pitt requires all of its incoming athletes to receive electrocardiograms (EKGs) and echocardiograms, tests that evaluate a person’s heart and attempt to uncover any abnormalities.

August 29th

CPR Training Might Become High School Graduation Requirement

SACRAMENTO, CA--California Gov. Jerry Brown has a month to sign a new bill that would make CPR training a high school graduation requirement.

The CPR in Schools legislation would require schools to teach students hands-on CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator.

Dr. John Maa is chair of the advocacy task force for the California American Heart Association.

"The provision of immediate CPR and defibrillation can more than double a victim's chance of survival," says Maa. "What this bill will do is train a new generation of lifesavers in the community to be to respond to cardiac arrest at the scene."

The bill would go into effect during the 2018-2019 school year.

San Francisco, San Diego and Placentia Yorba Linda Unified School Districts already require CPR in schools.

Use of AED Revives Carrollton Teen Who Collapsed at School

CARROLLTON, TX--A seventh grader from Carrollton is recovering after she went into cardiac arrest and collapsed during volleyball practice, and the fast actions by her coaches helped save her life.

"One of the last things I remember is hearing breathing in my ear and looking over at my friend and that's it," Amanda Marquez said.

As she lay lifeless on the gym floor, her family says three coaches and the principal at Creek Valley Middle School sprang into action, doing CPR, dialing 911 and using an automated external defibrillator – or AED – to jump start her heart.

August 24th

Creating a New Generation of Lifesavers

Slow but steady progress

Thirty-four states and the District of Columbia now require CPR-AED education before high school graduation. More than two million students will be trained annually as a result. A list of states and the number of students who graduate each year is provided below.

States that do not have laws requiring CPR-AED education include Alaska, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Wyoming.

August 12th

Cardiac Emergency Response Planning for Schools Published in School Nurse Journal

In 2015, the American Heart Association assembled a group of stakeholders from several organizations, including the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, to develop tools to assist schools in establishing cardiac emergency response plans. Led by co-chairs Kathleen Rose, RN, and Monica Goble, MD, they prepared “Cardiac Emergency Response Planning for Schools: A Policy Statement.”

July 25th

NCAA Reminding Trainers, Coaches To Use Cardiac Arrest Checklist

Summer school classrooms are humming with activity on college campuses across the nation and soon, so will sports fields full of student athletes returning for training camps and practices.

But before they do, the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s top medical chief is reminding head athletic trainers and team physicians about a rare, but important concern of theirs: sudden cardiac death.

In a memo, Brian Hainline, M.D., provides a reminder of significant recommendations the NCAA made this spring about pre-participation health screenings for athletes – and the need to bolster emergency response plans to ensure quick and potentially lifesaving responses to students who experience sudden cardiac arrest.

June 27th

Miami Dade School System Adds CPR Training as Part Personal Fitness Graduation Requirement

Miami Dade County becomes first school district in Florida to pass CPR in schools as a policy.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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