Archive - Jan 2011 - Blog entry

Archive - Jan 2011 - Blog entry

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January 30th

There's an opportunity to misunderstand...

and it appears that many people are taking it.
The wonderful piece in the New England Journal of Medicine a few days ago makes the point that the heart rhythms "shockable" by an AED (ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia) are more commonly observed in public places than in the home.
That doesn't mean that more people who arrest in public are more likely to have those rhythms. It means that BY THE TIME SOMEONE GETS A DEVICE LIKE AN AED OR A DEFIBRILLATOR ONTO A CARDIAC ARREST VICTIM, MORE PEOPLE IN PUBLIC PLACES ARE IN A SHOCKABLE RHYTHM THAN ARE PEOPLE AT HOME. THIS IS BECAUSE IT TAKES LONGER TO GET AN AED OR A DEFIBRILLATOR ONTO A PERSON WHO ARRESTS AT HOME..

January 27th

Another Argument for more Public Access AED's

Cardiac Arrest in Homes vs.

January 4th

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Can Also Strike the Young

 

Emilie PuricelliEach year an estimated 325,000 people die in the United States from Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA).  Of that number the Heart Rhythm Society estimates about 7,000 of these deaths are in children and infants.

On August 30th, 1997, my seemingly healthy 22 year old daughter, Emilie, died suddenly, in her sleep, from Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

January 1st

Grateful to be able to start a new year!

  I am 43 and in August of 2010 suffered sudden cardiac arrest after Mt. Biking.  I was extremely fortunate that another rider who had just finished the same time knew CPR and got on me immediately.  I was shocked back by the paramedics and taken to St. Vincents Hospital in Indianapolis.  I then spent 10 days on life support while using Therapeutic Hypothermia.  After coming off the respirator I spent a few more days in the hospital a week at home and then had a Quintuple Bypass.  Recovery since has went extremely well.  I am back to riding, running and swimming with the goal of a Tri in the next year or so.  I would love to get more involved with SCA but am not sure where to start.  Any suggestions or comments would be appreciated.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

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