Archive - Jun 2008 - Blog entry

Archive - Jun 2008 - Blog entry

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June 30th

How to Save A Life

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), often misunderstood as a massive heart attack, is a treatable condition that does not have to lead to sudden death. When someone suffers SCA, he or she may be fine one minute and then collapse without warning the next. Without immediate intervention, the victim almost always dies. SCA is the leading cause of death in the U.S., affecting more people than breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, AIDS, traffic accidents, house fires and gunshot wounds combined. Only 6-7% survive SCA nationally--but 50% or more could survive. You can make the difference between life and death for someone you care about by knowing what to do and doing it quickly.

STEPS

June 15th

A tragic reminder of the National CPR/AED week, could Tim Russert have been saved?

 Many newspapers ran stories about the first annual National CPR/AED week. Congress set aside the first week in June to spotlight how lives can be saved if more Americans know CPR and how to use an AED (a defibrillator).

Now we have many stories of the tragedy of a high profile public figure struck down by cardiac arrest that may have been prevented through the availability and use of an AED. Details may be forthcoming, but the story so far is that Tim Russert did receive bystander CPR, but no defibrillation until the EMTs arrived some minutes after his collapse. This is all too common a situation and causes hundreds of deaths per day across the country.

Could Tim’s demise help us to save someone else? It’s all too easy, Call 9-1-1, and start CPR. Ask someone to get an AED, and then use it. They are simple and safe, even a child can do it.

June 3rd

Will the AHA’s Hands-Only CPR Advisory Help Improve Survival Rates?

Even though sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a preventable and treatable condition, most victims die because they do not receive effective help quickly enough. To survive SCA, it is critical for the victim to receive immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and treatment with a defibrillator within five minutes. Since even the best EMS responders cannot always get to the victim in time (typical EMS response times are seven to eight minutes after receipt of the 9-1-1 call), survival generally depends on the help of bystanders who witness the victim’s sudden death and intervene without hesitation.

To improve SCA survival rates, it is vital for potential bystanders to be aware that SCA is a public health crisis and that survival from SCA depends largely on bystander intervention. Lifesaving bystander actions include calling 9-1-1, giving CPR, and using an automated external defibrillator (AED).

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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Contact Us

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

724-625-0025

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
7500 Brooktree Road
Wexford, PA 15090

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