Archive - Blog entry

Archive - Blog entry

August 4th, 2019

Hiking with defib/pacemaker after aborted sudden cardiac arrest

On March 7, 2019, I was hiking alone in Frozen Head State Park in Tennessee. I just finished climbing a tough 2.5 mile section of the trail and was about .5 miles from the trailhead (with a road near it). Suddenly, my heart began that fast pounding and my breathing turned very labored. I leaned over my poles and waited for this to stop. Previously, I had episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia and figured this was more of the same. I was wrong. It did not stop. I clawed at my neck thinking something was caught and then tried to get my pack off with the same thought. I could not unsnap the pack- it was too difficult for some reason. My bladder let lose and then I knew sustained VT would kill me. Becoming an observer (I am academia)- I thought, "I will be the first sibling to die" and "Now I know how I would die." It was very confusing at that point. Tried to sit down and somehow ended up lying in the cold mud of the trail on my left side.

July 25th

My SCA Event

This post is from a caregivers account of my SCA, sudden cardiac arrest.

On June 29th, 2019 my wife retired to the bedroom earlier than usual while I stayed up to watch the local late news. At some point shortly before midnight I made my way to our bedroom. I woke my wife and informed her that I was having a heart attack and that we needed to go to the ER. She promptly got dressed and took me to the hospital. Luckily it was quicker for her to take me than wait for an ambulance as we live five minutes away from the ER. The doctor told her if we had waited I would not be here.

June 11th

Is RVLM (Medulla) safety mandatory for life?

In SCA and many critical conditions death ensues the loss of blood pressure due to RVLM debacle.

To save life should we safeguard first RVLM and secondarily the brain and thirdly the heart?

May 3rd

Brugada

Hi All, my youngest son had his first sca a year and a half ago. It was very traumatic but he survived. He was diagnosed with Brugada Syndrome and has had a defib fitted. We began to feel that he was then infallible but last Sunday he had another episode and the defib shocked him twice to bring him back round.
He is 26 and I was wondering if there are any other people here who have or are going through the same ordeal who would be willing to talk to us about the way they are dealing with emotions surrounding living with this condition.
With thanks

May 1st

The Law Protects AED Rescuers

By Steve Tannenbaum

Did you know that the law actually encourages lay people and bystanders to perform CPR and to use an AED on people who have suffered from sudden cardiac arrest and that it actually protects them from litigation?

Traditionally, the public has been concerned about performing CPR and using an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) due to fears of hurting the victim and potentially incurring liability. Neither of these two fears are accurate or true. A person who has just suffered from a sudden cardiac arrest is clinically dead. It is not possible to cause further injury to such a victim by performing CPR or by using an AED.

April 15th

The Masters come back story after SCA

My body on April 6, 2018 went into Cardiac Arrest. I’ve had 5 stents, 1 ablation, 1 pacemaker, out of work for 4 months, and 36 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation. I was without a pulse for up to 20-25 minutes before the AED was able to get my heart back into rhythm.

My wife’s friends who had invited us to the Masters golf tournament last year where I had my cardiac arrest asked us if we were interested in returning. At first I was reluctant and the more I thought about the invite the more I was determined to appreciate the return visit and to have a prayer at the site where I was victim to Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

March 6th

Take a Step for Survival! Join or Support Our Team Today.

You are invited to join or support the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation team at the Highmark Walk for a Healthy Community. The annual 5K walk, scheduled for May 11th in Pittsburgh, PA, is underwritten by Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield, so all funds raised go directly participating nonprofits.
 

February 20th

Lasting Inspiration: How One Woman Built a New Generation of Lifesavers

Many people occasionally volunteer, perhaps for a loved one’s sports league or by making the occasional donation to a worthwhile cause. Few, however, make it their life’s mission to help and inspire others, as is the case with Allison Gingold.

Allison was born into philanthropy. “I was raised in a family that espoused the importance of charitable giving, both monetarily and with our time and energy. It is how I was raised in our Jewish community, as a part of our culture and religious identity-- it is a form of social justice,” she says.

January 19th

My son

Hi - this is my first post and I'm desperately seeking people who have been where I am. We have done counseling for many months, worked with a very supportive group of friends and church members but really have no one who REALLY gets it.

January 17th

Understanding Sudden Cardiac Arrest Drives Bystander Action

Once laypersons understand Sudden Cardiac Arrest, they are highly motivated to give CPR and apply an AED—critical actions that will save more lives.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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Contact Us

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
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Wexford, PA 15090

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