Archive - 2019

Archive - 2019

June 24th

CPR Working Group, Dissolving After Years of Advancing CPR Quality, Provides Grant to Support Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation

PITTSBURGH, PA--In 2008, Laerdal Medical, Philips Healthcare and ZOLL Medical Corporation formed a CPR Improvement Working Group to improve CPR quality. Each company contributed substantial financial resources to support efforts in this area and the Working Group used these funds to make grants to support this goal across many activities. The Working Group had many successes, including making recommendations for measuring CPR quality in training and clinical situations, for reviewing CPR performance, and for post-event debriefing. A number of articles were published in the popular media and many experts were funded. The companies recently agreed the Working Group’s objectives have been achieved and the activities have been extraordinarily successful.

June 23rd

More than $14 million Awarded for New Research on Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Northwestern University, University of Michigan, University of Washington and Vanderbilt University Medical Center leading novel studies in newest American Heart Association Strategically Focused Research Network Research center teams will develop, test and implement innovative new ways to help prevent and treat heart arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest.
 
  • New treatments in the works include a drug delivered by nasal spray or injection that can be used during CPR to help protect the brain and a drug that can normalize calcium in heart cells to prevent a deadly arrhythmia
  • The roles of genetics and gender will also be explored with the goal of helping to better identify and treat people most at risk for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Additional plans are to design processes to improve the response time for CPR and defibrillation and develop tools to help clinician

June 20th

New E-Tattoo Enables Accurate, Uninterrupted Heart Monitoring for Days

AUSTIN, TX--The leading cause of death in Texas is heart disease, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, accounting for more than 45,000 deaths statewide in 2017. A new wearable technology made from stretchy, lightweight material could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate than existing electrocardiograph machines — a technology that has changed little in almost a century.

Developed by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin and led by Nanshu Lu in the Cockrell School of Engineering, this is the latest incarnation of Lu’s electronic tattoo technology, a graphene-based wearable device that can be placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.

June 19th

Philips Receives FDA Premarket Approval for its HeartStart OnSite and HeartStart Home Defibrillators

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS--Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA), a global leader in health technology, today announced that the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company’s premarket approval (PMA) application for its HeartStart OnSite defibrillator [1] and HeartStart Home defibrillator [2], and the relevant supporting accessories, such as batteries and pad electrodes.

Philips’ HeartStart OnSite and HeartStart Home defibrillators are the only over-the-counter automated external defibrillators (AEDs) available to consumers in the US, while the HeartStart Home defibrillator is the only AED specifically indicated for home environments.

Cardiac Arrest Detection Developed for Smart Speakers

'Alexa, monitor my heart.'  Researchers design artificial-intelligence system to recognize ominous gasps for air.

Almost 500,000 Americans die each year from cardiac arrest, when the heart suddenly stops beating.

June 17th

Health Data Collaboration Will Improve Outcomes for Medical Emergencies

American Heart Association and RapidSOS to connect first responders and 9-1-1 telecommunicators with life-saving medical information

NEW YORK, NY--Too often life-saving medical data isn’t available to first responders during emergencies. A new collaboration between the American Heart Association, and emergency technology company, RapidSOS, will help solve this issue by teaming up to promote a voluntary registry for citizens to share data with 911 and first responders. People can provide opt-in profile information and individual health data, personalizing care and positively transforming emergency outcomes. 

June 16th

Fun in the Water Can Turn Tragic in an Instant, Especially for Children

Nicole and Jonathan Hughes, a teacher and a physician with three young children, were acutely aware of the dangers of swimming pools and lakes. From fenced-off pools to life jackets to constant supervision, they did everything right.

Tragedy struck anyway.

Last June, as the family was about to head to an Alabama beach for an evening crab hunt, 3-year-old Levi somehow slipped out of their vacation house and found his way to the pool. In what seemed like an instant he was face down in the water, and couldn't be revived.

June 12th

Gov. Wolf Signs Bill to Develop CPR Curriculum

HARRISBURG, PA--Today, Gov. Tom Wolf signed into law Act 7 of 2019, formerly Senate Bill 115, which will require the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) to create potentially life-saving curriculum for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

“I’m proud to sign into law this important life-saving measure. Each additional set of hands trained to do CPR increases the likelihood that a cardiac arrest will be reversed,” said Gov. Wolf. “Teaching our young Pennsylvanians to save a life not only promotes the health of all of Pennsylvania, it builds a sense of community and neighborliness.”

June 11th

Is RVLM (Medulla) safety mandatory for life?

In SCA and many critical conditions death ensues the loss of blood pressure due to RVLM debacle.

To save life should we safeguard first RVLM and secondarily the brain and thirdly the heart?

June 10th

Magician-Turned-Doctor Knows the Trick to Helping Save Lives with CPR – Just Watch

Dr. Alson Inaba has no shortage of tricks up his sleeve.

He's the doctor who figured out that the Bee Gees tune "Stayin' Alive" has the same beat you need to do CPR correctly, making the disco classic a powerful tool to keep hearts pumping.

For his next act, Inaba hopes to set lifesaving to a more modern tune – Bruno Mars' "Uptown Funk."

"One phrase that Bruno repeats over and over in his song is, "Don't believe me, just watch,'" Inaba said. "Imagine this scene: Two people see a colleague collapse from sudden cardiac arrest. The first person says to the second, 'Did you know that if I do chest compressions to 'Uptown Funk,' I could save this person's life? Don't believe me? Just watch!'"

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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