Archive - 2017

Archive - 2017

August 10th

Korey Stringer Institute Ranks State High School Sports Safety Policies

The Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut has announced the release of the Health and Safety Policy Ranking for High School Athletics. The purpose of this study is to provide a graded assessment of the implementation of health and safety policies related to the leading causes of sudden death and catastrophic injury in sport at the state level for secondary school athletics within the United States. The review was based on publicly available information from high school associations and state legislation.

August 9th

Closing the Cardiac Arrest Survival Gap

University of Iowa study examines racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest

Cardiac arrest—when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating—is fairly common among hospitalized patients, affecting approximately 200,000 patients in the U.S. each year.

Historically, the likelihood of surviving an in-hospital cardiac arrest was low—roughly one in eight patients would live long enough to be discharged. Among black patients, the survival rate was even lower than that of white patients, according to previous research.

August 8th

Learning from Iowa's Experience

Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools

A study by Derek Hoyme and Dianne Atkins, MD at the University of Iowa may serve as an example to states that have yet to require CPR training before high school graduation.

August 7th

My Kid Is In There, MRIs of Locked-in Children Confirm

Structural and functional MRI in children resuscitated after drowning pinpoints the site of anoxic brain injury to regions controlling movement, while providing strong evidence that networks controlling perception and cognition remain largely intact. In the not-too-distant future, it should be possible to target the area of injury with neuroprotective therapies — now being tested in animal models — when childhood drowning victims first arrive at the emergency room.

August 3rd

One in Four ICD Patients Need Reintervention Within Five Years

New registry data underscore the need for risk/benefit conversations with patients at the time of implantation, experts say.

After five years, approximately one in four patients treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) will require reoperation, a new study shows. And while the reoperation rate varies according to the device type and the age of the patient, the registry results suggest that complication and reintervention rates are higher than physicians and patients realize.

You can save a life!

Visit our GOFUNDME page and consider a donation of $25 or more.

July 26th

Longer Cooling Does Not Harm and May Even Help Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients

Eight out of 355 cardiac arrest patients who do not immediately wake up after hospitalization have benefited from being cooled down to a temperature of 33°C for as long as 48 hours. However, this does not provide researchers from Aarhus University and elsewhere with evidence to conclude that 48-hour cooling is preferable to the typical 24 hours when it comes to preventing brain damage. The level of uncertainty is too high and the difference too small to reach this conclusion.

A reminder on AED Maintenance

I recently came across this story--http://globalnews.ca/news/3613170/winnipeg-woman-speaks-out-after-husbands-heart-stops-aed-malfunctions/ the ran through details regarding an SCA event that took place in just the last week or two.

Essentially, an off-duty fireman spending time with his family and some colleagues of his was hit with an attack that dropped him immediately. While he couldn't have really asked for better company to face such an event in his life (after all, how many are "lucky"--and I use the word loosely--enough to have a cardiac event in the presence of trained EMT's?), not everything went as smooth as possible in this type of emergency. Namely, the AED at the family entertainment spot where he was visiting wasn't working despite being present. Obviously, a non-working unit is no better than not having one at all.

Improvements to Public Awareness of CPR

Many reading this site instruct others in CPR at varying levels. Whether Community based or professional level. Some may teach Red Cross,National Safety Council, ASHI or AHA. I myself oversee an AHA Training Center, HealthSav LLC based in New York about 25 miles North of NYC in Rockland County. Our TC yearly trains several thousand people, mostly for certification courses but I myself also try to grow Family & Friends and Hands Only Training.

What the training community needs to focus on is that no matter how good our training can be, the individual being trained can only be trained the day that they attend the course. The retention level of CPR Training is exceedingly low. This is true for nurses, EMT's, Paramedics. Whomever you can name. This is also true for most Instructors as instructors are only required to teach 4 courses in a 2 year period to retain their instructor credentials. Quality control is an issue for both students and instructors.

July 25th

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Urges Pennsylvania Legislature to Require CPR Training Before High School Graduation

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation urges patients, families and other advocates to submit testimonials in support of the legislation.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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