Archive - 2017

Archive - 2017

November 7th

More Cardiac Arrest Victims Could Survive with Dispatcher CPR Instruction, Rescue Breaths for Children

American Heart Association Moves to Annual Guidelines Update, a First for the Organization

November 2nd

How many households where both adults can perform a 2" chest compression on their spouse?

In the USA there are about 1,000 cardiac arrests each day. About 70% occur in a private residence. Two-thirds of the victims are male.

In a sample of 50 couples, the result was the same as the prior examination with 30 couples: the percentage of households where each adult could perform a single two-inch compression on their spouse was zero.

Does this mean you shouldn't try? NOT AT ALL!

But it does suggest an alternate strategy: Have a personal AED at home and take it with you when you travel!

This works so much better than the suggestion that both spouses should alter their diets to get to where both weigh about 25% more than the other!

Bob

October 31st

Should a lay bystander use CPR/AED?

I have been wondering lately about my legal liability when it comes to using CPR/AED. My career training included the requirement to become certified in First Aid and CPR, along with using an AED. So since I was trained it was assumed that I would start a rescue should an emergency arise in my workplace--and my employer would insure, protect, and defend me if there were any lawsuit against me as a result of my trying to save someone.
I am retired now and it isn’t always obvious what legal risk I as a bystander might be taking when trying to help any victim in need of immediate aid. My First Aid certification has expired and although I plan to get fresh info and training in using an AED, I still have questions about my standing if I’m ever put in the position of first responder to an SCA emergency. Here is what I have found out, according to the American Heart Association and other organizations focused on promoting CPR/AED.

Societies Detail Treatment for Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias

WASHINGTON, DC--The American College of Cardiology, along with the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society, today published new guidelines for the treatment of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death.

Ventricular arrhythmias are an abnormal heartbeat arising from the heart’s lower chambers, or ventricles. This condition can lead to cardiac arrest, which, in turn, results in sudden cardiac death if the abnormal rhythm is not quickly stopped to restore a normal rhythm.

October 25th

Training CPR Rescuers, One Traveler at a Time

There are currently 16 Hands-Only CPR training kiosks nationwide.

After Indianapolis International Airport installed a Hands-Only CPR training kiosk in March 2016, Juan Muñoz, a police officer at the airport, made it a regular stop as he patrolled the terminals, trying it a couple times a week.

The interactive program, which measures quality of compression depth and pace, as well as hand position, sparked a competitive spirit in Muñoz, who kept trying to improve his results.

“I just kept practicing until I perfected it,” said Muñoz, who is required to undergo CPR certification every two years.

A month later, on April 5, those skills were put to the test when a passenger alerted Muñoz to a woman in cardiac distress.

October 23rd

One year SCA Survivor

August 20, 2017 marked the first anniversary of my rebirth! It was exactly a year ago to that date that a SCA changed my life forever. That Friday was a particularly normal Friday, like most Fridays in my life.
I had gone to work all day, went out to eat dinner with some friends, and then went home to bed. It was like I said, a normal Friday. No abnormal symptoms, nothing out of the ordinary. I prepared for bed at around 11:00 pm. I drifted off to sleep and never woke up....

Thinking about it—where’s an AED when you need one?

After suggesting in a recent post that being proactive is the way to go when it comes to locating an AED when you need one, I decided to start asking whenever I am in a public place if there is actually an AED present. This started in my local library, and I found that there was none in place here.

When I asked the librarian, I was told that the fire department is a half block away and that’s what they would probably rely on if there was an [SCA emergency]. That sounds good, but wouldn’t I rather know that there is an AED available to the public right here where there are parking lots, buildings, hiking paths, etc. with lots of traffic around—automobiles, joggers, pedestrians?

Let’s check in again with the Mayo Clinic:

October 22nd

African Americans Live Shorter Lives Due to Heart Disease and Stroke

Statement Highlights:

  • African Americans carry a higher burden of cardiovascular diseases compared with white Americans.
  • Risk factors for heart disease appear earlier in African Americans than in whites.
  • Social determinants of health, stress and cultural factors all play a role.

The scientific statement notes that African Americans have higher rates of both sudden cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death, compared with white Americans.

October 17th

MRI May Predict Neurological Outcomes for Cardiac Arrest Survivors

MRI-based measurements of the functional connections in the brain can help predict long-term recovery in patients who suffer neurological disability after cardiac arrest, according to a study appearing online in the journal Radiology.

OAKBROOK, IL--Cardiac arrest, or abrupt loss in heart function, is a common and often deadly occurrence that affects hundreds of thousands of people every year in the United States alone, according to the American Heart Association. Many patients who survive end up with severe neurological disabilities, as the temporary loss of oxygenated blood flow to the brain can result in widespread neuronal cell death.

Are you ready to save a life?

I'm new to the community, but wanted to share a short post/story I wrote designed to help people connect with the reality of saving a life in an SCA emergency. Thanks for the opportunity!

You’re somewhere, anywhere. In an elevator, on the sidewalk, at a sports event when the unthinkable happens--an apparently healthy stranger goes down. It might be a teen, an adult, or an older person, but down he or she goes and suddenly you are your brother’s keeper! If you don’t respond quickly, that person may die and leave you wondering if you could have done something to keep him alive.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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