Archive - Mar 2017

Archive - Mar 2017

March 14th

‘Harmless’ Painkillers Associated With Increased Risk of Cardiac Arrest

Researchers advise avoiding diclofenac and limiting ibuprofen to 1200 mg per day

Painkillers considered harmless by the general public are associated with increased risk of cardiac arrest, according to research published today in the March issue of European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used drugs worldwide and some, including ibuprofen, are available over the counter.

“Allowing these drugs to be purchased without a prescription, and without any advice or restrictions, sends a message to the public that they must be safe,” said author Professor Gunnar H. Gislason, professor of cardiology at Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Denmark. “Previous studies have shown that NSAIDs are related to increased cardiovascular risk which is a concern because they are widely used.”

South Dakota Becomes 36th State to Require CPR Training to Graduate

Capitol building, Pierre, South DakotaCPR training will now be a requirement to graduate high school in South Dakota under legislation signed into law Friday.

South Dakota is now one of 36 states and Washington, D.C., that require high school students to be taught CPR based on American Heart Association guidelines. In those states combined, more than 2.1 million public high school students each year will have been trained in CPR.

The new law takes effect with the 2017-2018 school year and will result in more than 8,000 additional South Dakotans trained in CPR each year.

March 8th

Experts Release Guidelines for Evaluating, Managing Syncope

First guidance on patients who faint will help physicians make better-informed decisions

WASHINGTON, DC--The American College of Cardiology, with the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society, today released a guideline on the evaluation and management of patients with syncope. The 2017 ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Syncope will publish online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation and HeartRhythm.

Syncope, or fainting, is caused by low blood pressure resulting in an insufficient supply of blood, and therefore oxygen, to the brain. This can happen due to several causes, some of them even due to a serious underlying medical condition. Until now, there have been no written standards outlining the best course of action to take when treating patients who faint.

Researchers Identify Gene That Can Cause Sudden Death in Young People and Athletes

Researchers from Canada, South Africa and Italy have identified a new gene that can lead to sudden death among young people and athletes.

The gene, called CDH2, causes arrhythmogenic right ventricle cardiomyopathy (ARVC), which is a genetic disorder that predisposes patients to cardiac arrest and is a major cause of unexpected death in seemingly healthy young people.

Emphasizing Safety and Encouraging Success is Theme of 8th Youth Sports Safety Summit

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation is one of 283 members of the Youth Sports Safety Alliance. SCA Foundation president, Mary M. Newman, MS, was among the presenters at National Athletic Trainers Association and Youth Sports Safetly Alliance Summit on March 7th in Indianapolis. "Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in athletes during sport," she said.

March 6th

Best Practice Recommendations for Youth Sports Leagues Released at Youth Sports Safety Summit

INDIANAPOLIS, IN--At the eighth Youth Sports Safety Summit this morning, leading health care experts released new recommendations, “The Inter-Association Task Force Document on Emergency Health and Safety: Best Practice Recommendations for Youth Sports Leagues,” published online first today in the Journal of Athletic Training, the scientific publication of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA). These groundbreaking health and safety guidelines provide a roadmap for national governing bodies (NGBs) to ensure the best policies and procedures are in place to protect young athletes.

The task force was originally convened in 2015, and has met annually since then through the leadership and collaboration of NATA and the Korey Stringer Institute. Today’s event was hosted by NATA and the Youth Sports Safety Alliance, comprising nearly 290 sport and health organizations committed to sports safety.

March 1st

I feel like I should care more

Since my SCA episode happened January 17, 2016. I have outwardly seemed to be doing extremely well. My doctors tell me I am doing well, I feel decent and everyone loves to tell me how "good" I look. Inside, I continue to battle depression - that feeling of why did I not just go ahead and die? I mean it seemed like an easy way to leave this world as opposed to so many people I have watched die a slow painful death from cancer or other medical issues. Did I just set myself up to die one of these deaths in 10 years?

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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