Archive - 2016

Archive - 2016

September 16th

How SCA Shaped My Life Today

This is my first personal blog post sharing my story with SCA. First off, my name is JR Bunda and I am currently 26 years old. I went into sudden cardiac arrest on December 10, 2012 when I had just turned 22 the week before. At the time I was a senior in college, playing Division I baseball at the University of Portland in Oregon. It has been my dream to play professional baseball since I first picked up a baseball in my childhood, so I was on a quest in pursuit to achieve my childhood goal. I had the talent to reach my dream, which is how I landed a scholarship to play college ball, but still needed much to learn.

My Story, 6 minutes and 30 seconds

1000 things could have gone wrong. Everything went right.

One second I am running on a basketball court and the next second I'm in an ambulance being taken to the hospital. That was my experience. What happened? I went into a fatal heart rhythm, ventricular fibrillation. I had no blockages, stroke, pains... dizziness, nothing. No advance warning. When I went down, my friends and acquaintances sprung into action. One guy called 911, 2 others started checking on me. They first thought I was having a seizure. Then they realized I had an undetectable pulse and started CPR compression. Someone knew there was an AED in the building and brought it over. The two guys doing CPR put the device on and it's saying deliver shock! deliver shock! Boom. One shock. A different guy took over CPR and continued until the Ambulance arrives and takes me to the hospital. The person who dialed 911 hung up. The call lasted 6 minutes.

September 15th

AHA Recommends Standards to Improve Dispatcher-Assisted CPR

Public Comment Period for Program and Metrics Open Through November 16, 2016

DALLAS, TX-- The American Heart Association – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease – published recommendations this month that set standards for timely and high quality delivery of dispatcher-assisted CPR, also known as telephone CPR (T-CPR). The recommendations are accompanied by performance goals to measure successful implementation by first responders.

Pittsburgh Premiere of Superior and Big Screen Debut of SCA Foundation Video A Success

PITTSBURGH, PA--During a Q and A session following a special screening of the feature film “Superior,” Director Edd Benda pointed out that the film, which had its Pittsburgh premiere at a Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation fundraising event, featured only one death scene—a mountain man suffers a cardiac arrest. Benda’s father, North Hills resident Bruce Benda, is a survivor of cardiac arrest so the irony was not lost on the audience of more than 60 moviegoers comprised of many survivors and their families.

September 11th

Study Shows Light Beams Could Be Used to Terminate Lethal Arrhythmias

Researchers at the University of Bonn and Johns Hopkins University lay out the basis for gentle defibrillation

September 8th

Pitt's Athlete Heart Testing Could Spark National Attention

When it was revealed eight days ago that two Pitt football players, freshmen Zack Gilbert and George Hill, would be forced to sit out after being diagnosed with heart conditions, the news was met with an outpouring of disappointment, grief and empathy for two athletes whose respective careers were suddenly in jeopardy or, worse, over before they even could begin.

With that agony, however, came an undercurrent of relief. As awful as this is, the sentiment went, thankfully it was discovered before it was too late, that it was identified through a series of tests instead of an autopsy.

Had either player attended a different school, their ailments might have remained undetected. Pitt requires all of its incoming athletes to receive electrocardiograms (EKGs) and echocardiograms, tests that evaluate a person’s heart and attempt to uncover any abnormalities.

August 31st

Two New Resuscitation Alliances Announce Decisive Goal to Increase Global Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates by 50 Percent

DALLAS, TX--A cohort of international health organizations, resuscitation leaders, and emergency medical systems that includes the American Heart Association (AHA) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease – today announced the establishment of the Global Resuscitation Alliance, declaring a bold goal of increasing cardiac arrest survival rates by 50 percent.

To support these efforts in the United States, the AHA, the Seattle-based Resuscitation Academy Foundation (RAF) and Laerdal Medical announced the creation of the Resuscitation Academy Collaborative. The Collaborative will identify and disseminate best practices to combat and reverse the global public health crisis of poor outcomes from cardiac arrest.

August 30th

Defibrillators Could Save Many More Lives If Associated with Basic Life Support Education

ROME, ITALY--Automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) fail to save lives when the public does not have basic life support education, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2016. The study found that public access defibrillation (PAD) programs are unevenly deployed across France, with an obvious impact on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival rate.

“The survival rate of OHCA remains extremely low,” said Dr. Nicole Karam, an interventional cardiologist at the European Hospital Georges Pompidou in Paris, France, on behalf of the Paris Sudden Death Expertise Centre led by Professor Xavier Jouven.

Sudden Death in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Rarely Associated with Exercise

ROME, ITALY--Sudden death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is rarely associated with exercise, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr. Gherardo Finocchiaro, a cardiologist at St. George’s University of London, UK.(1) Nearly 80% of patients in the study had no symptoms and only one in five had been diagnosed with HCM before their death.

August 29th

CPR Training Might Become High School Graduation Requirement

SACRAMENTO, CA--California Gov. Jerry Brown has a month to sign a new bill that would make CPR training a high school graduation requirement.

The CPR in Schools legislation would require schools to teach students hands-on CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator.

Dr. John Maa is chair of the advocacy task force for the California American Heart Association.

"The provision of immediate CPR and defibrillation can more than double a victim's chance of survival," says Maa. "What this bill will do is train a new generation of lifesavers in the community to be to respond to cardiac arrest at the scene."

The bill would go into effect during the 2018-2019 school year.

San Francisco, San Diego and Placentia Yorba Linda Unified School Districts already require CPR in schools.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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