Archive - 2015

Archive - 2015

November 9th

Partners of Heart Defibrillator Patients Concerned About Resuming Sex

Study Highlights: 

  • Partners of people with heart defibrillators have more concerns about resuming sexual activity than patients immediately after the device is implanted.
  • Concerns declined for both over three months.

ORLANDO, FL--Intimate partners of people with heart defibrillators are more concerned about resuming sexual activity than the patients immediately after the device is implanted, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) deliver an electric shock to the heart to correct life threatening heart beats.

November 8th

Common Antibiotics Increase Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias, Cardiac Death

WASHINGTON, DC--Macrolides--a group of commonly used antibiotics for bacterial infections like pneumonia, bronchitis, and some sexually transmitted diseases--are associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of sudden cardiac death, according to a meta-analysis of 33 studies involving more than 20 million patients published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Researchers from China analyzed data from studies conducted between 1966 and 2015, comparing patients treated with macrolides to similar patients treated with other antibiotics or with no antibiotic therapy. 

Middle School Students Learn CPR in Single PE Class

ORLANDO, FL--A one-time, 45-minute educational session on basic life support has the power to greatly improve middle school students’ CPR knowledge and skills, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers evaluated the use of a 45-minute basic life support class given to 41 eighth-grade students during a physical education class. The instructors taught students about chest compressions and automated external defibrillators (AED) use. Researchers also studied the effect of repeat education by giving half the students a repeat course two months later, but no such course for the others. They tested students’ CPR knowledge and retention before and right after the initial session, as well as two and four months later.

November 7th

In First Real-World Example, Penn Study Shows Mechanical and Manual CPR Produce Equivalent Survival Rates for Cardiac Arrest Patients

Study builds on previous trials examining the association of mechanical CPR with survival

ORLANDO, FL--Mechanical CPR, in which a device is used by Emergency Medical Service (EMS) providers to deliver automated chest compressions during cardiac arrest resuscitation care, is associated with an equivalent survival rate for patients experiencing cardiac arrest outside of the hospital as manual CPR, according to new findings from a team of researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the first large scale, real-world proof that mechanical CPR may be an equivalent alternative to manual CPR for treating patients experiencing extensive cardiac arrest episodes and requiring advanced life support services. The results are being presented during the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Some Long QT Syndrome Patients May Benefit From ICDs Before Cardiac Arrest Occurs

ORLANDO, FL--Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) can prevent life-threatening rhythms in patients with a hereditary heart rhythm disorder (Long QT Syndrome), including those who have not previously suffered cardiac arrest, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

ICDs are recommended to treat long QT syndrome in patients who have survived cardiac arrest. It isn’t clear, however, if ICDs could be a preventive tool.

Researchers followed 212 Long QT syndrome patients who had ICDs, but had not experienced life-threatening events. They analyzed occurrences of life-saving electrical shocks to halt dangerous rhythms, then identified parameters that would help identify patients at high risk for sudden cardiac death.

During an average 9.2 years follow-up, 23 percent of the patients had shocks that terminated life-threatening heart rhythms, and 34 percent had unnecessary shocks.

Just One Energy Drink May Boost Heart Disease Risk in Young Adults

ORLANDO, FL--Drinking one 16-ounce energy drink boosts blood pressure and stress hormone responses in young, healthy adults, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. These changes could conceivably trigger new cardiovascular events.

Researchers studied 25 healthy young adults with no known cardiovascular risk factors. Each drank one 16-ounce can of a commercially available energy drink or a sham drink in random order on two separate days. Researchers measured participants’ blood pressure and blood levels of norepinephrine before and 30 minutes after drink consumption. Norepinephrine is a “fight or flight” chemical that increases blood pressure and the heart’s ability to contract and it modulates heart rate and breathing in response to perceived stress.

Video-Only CPR Training Without a Manikin Still Effective

ORLANDO, FL--Using a video to train family members of patients at risk for cardiac arrest in CPR may be just as effective as using the traditional hands-on method with a manikin, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The findings suggest simplified and more cost-effective approaches may be useful for disseminating CPR education to families of at-risk patients and the general public. The results are being presented during the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2015.

November 6th

In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests at Night Associated with Increased Brain Damage

ORLANDO, FL--Hospitalized patients suffering cardiac arrest at night are more likely to have poor neurological outcome, compared to day time patients, according researcher presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers studied information about patients’ survivals after in-hospital cardiac arrest at a teaching hospital in Switzerland. They documented that the hospital’s rapid response team was activated for 270 patients with cardiac arrest. Two-thirds of those cardiac arrests occurred during the day shift.

While rapid response team’s reaction times for cardiac arrest were similar during the day and at night, researchers found patients having the cardiac arrests during the day were:

Most Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors Emerge Without Brain Damage

ORLANDO, FL--Most adults who survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrests emerge with their brain function intact, even if their resuscitations took longer than previously recommended, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers studied how the duration of prehospital resuscitation impacts survivors neurologically by analyzing attempted resuscitations on people who suffered cardiac arrests in an urban/suburban area from 2005 to 2014.

Of the 3,814 resuscitations analyzed, 12.2 percent of patients survived. Of those, 83.9 percent of the survivors did not have significant neurological complications (normal function or disability that still allows them to live independently and work) from the resuscitations.

About 90 percent of the neurologically-intact survivors were resuscitated in 35 minutes or less, the other 10 percent took longer than 35 minutes.

Can’t Find an AED? There May Be an App for That

ORLANDO, FL--The earlier bystanders can deliver shocks with an automated external defibrillator (AED)  to people who have cardiac arrest outside the hospital, the better their chances are for survival. Although it may be difficult to find community-based AEDs, a new smartphone application helps connect rescuers with lifesaving AEDs and victims with sudden cardiac arrest, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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