Archive - 2013

Archive - 2013

December 18th

Training and ZOLL AEDs Help Ottawa Paramedic Service Saves Lives

One City Employee Saves a Second Hockey Player from SCA

ZOLL Medical Corporation, a manufacturer of medical devices and related software solutions, announced today that the Public Access Defibrillator program conducted by the Ottawa Paramedic Service (OPS) has saved 74 lives from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) thanks to training individuals in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using the ZOLL AED PLUS®.

December 17th

28-Year-Old Cardiac Arrest Survivor Meets EMS Personnel Who Helped Save Him

RICHMOND, VA--When Michael Snyder, Jr. suffered a sudden cardiac arrest last December at the age of 27, immediate action was taken by his family and soon thereafter, emergency services. All worked together to save his life. 

Michael, his wife Jennifer, Jennifer’s brother and cousin had returned home after dinner out and Michael began to feel ill.  He asked his wife for a glass of water and when she came back, she found him slumped over and unconscious. When his family dialed 9-1-1 and initiated CPR, they set in motion a life-saving process known as the 'Chain of Survival.’ During the 911 call, Richmond Ambulance Authority dispatcher Travis Gortney gave CPR instructions while Richmond Fire’s Quint 18 and a paramedic crew from the Richmond Ambulance Authority responded to the scene.

December 16th

Schools Join War on Cardiac Arrest

ATLANTA, GA--This past August, while in class at Roswell High School, 17-year-old Andrew Hawks suddenly felt his heart rate go up.

Henry Ford Hospital Implants New Defibrillator for People at Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

DETROIT, Dec. 16, 2013 -- /PRNewswire/ -- A new internal defibrillator, on the cusp of a new standard of care in American cardiology to treat patients for a major heart risk, is being used at Henry Ford Hospital.

Compared to the current devices used to treat sudden cardiac arrest, the new internal defibrillator has less risk of infection, no clots forming in blood vessels, no lead perforation through the heart wall, or puncturing the lining of the lung. Also, the lead is not subject to normal wear and tear of heart movement, as it is just under the skin, not inside the heart, which can cause breakdown of leads, thus needing to replace them.

Internal defibrillators are small devices, similar to pacemakers, which send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore its normal rhythm. The lead is the flexible electrical wire that conducts the shock from the defibrillator to the heart.

AED training added to school health requirements

While graduating from high school has many requirements, Washington students have another: training in saving lives.

Under House Bill 1556, students are now required to have training in using an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) to help save someone going into cardiac arrest. The law was passed on May 8 of this year, and it became effective at the end of July. Before graduating from high school, students are required to have taken a health class that offers CPR and AED training.

“This has real-world applications,” said Lt. John Payne, who works for the City of Bremerton Fire Department. Payne and a few others volunteer to train Bremerton High School students for emergency situations that may require resuscitation.

“I think it is a great mandate,” he said of the new policy. Payne noted that many requirements for students have been put in place that don’t necessarily apply to real-world situations.

This policy, however, does, Payne said.

December 15th

What Bystanders Should Know About CPR--And Why

Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has poor neurological outcome, and this is true even when the bystanders are family members, which suggests deficits in public CPR training.

A recent Japanese study of CPR initiated out of hospital by family versus non-family showed that significantly fewer family members initiated CPR (P<0.001) and significantly fewer patients requiring resuscitation had 1-month survival (P=0.049) or neurologically favorable survival (P=0.016) when treated by a family member, according to research from Keiko Fujie, MD, of the University of Tsukuba in Ibaraki, Japan, and colleagues, which was published online by Resuscitation.

Henry Ford Hospital Implants New Defibrillator for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

DETROIT, MI--A new internal defibrillator, on the cusp of a new standard of care in American cardiology to treat patients for a major heart risk, is being used at Henry Ford Hospital.

Compared to the current devices used to treat sudden cardiac arrest, the new internal defibrillator has less risk of infection, no clots forming in blood vessels, no lead perforation through the heart wall, or puncturing the lining of the lung. Also, the lead is not subject to normal wear and tear of heart movement, as it is just under the skin, not inside the heart, which can cause breakdown of leads, thus needing to replace them.

Internal defibrillators are small devices, similar to pacemakers, which send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore its normal rhythm. The lead is the flexible electrical wire that conducts the shock from the defibrillator to the heart.

December 13th

Putting the FDA's Recent Safety Communication in Context

Philips HeartStart FRx, Home, and OnSite AEDs are safe and effective, and owners should not hesitate to retrieve and use these life-saving devices in cardiac arrest emergencies. That’s the lead. Yet, you wouldn’t know that from all the frightening media headlines generated in response to the recent FDA safety communication regarding these AEDs. Nor from the plaintiff’s lawyers who are already soliciting cases involving these devices (imagine what they would say if one of these AEDs wasn’t used to try to save an SCA victim).

Sudden Cardiac Death in Untreated Lyme Carditis

Quick-thinking pathologists at a Georgia tissue bank recently found Lyme disease in sudden cardiac death patients whose tissues were being examined for transplant use. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported details of those cases in an article published in the December 13 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report to alert pathologists, medical examiners, and coroners of the need to consider Lyme carditis in cases of sudden cardiac death. CDC investigators warned clinicians to check cardiac status in patients with Lyme disease and Lyme exposure in patients with acute, unexplained cardiac symptoms.

December 11th

ECCU Scheduled for June 2014 in Las Vegas

ECCU 2014

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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