Archive - Aug 2013

Archive - Aug 2013

August 29th

States That Require AEDs in Schools

Nineteen states now mandate AEDs to be in at least some schools. They are: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. 

For more information, click here.

SOURCE: Scripps Howard News Service

August 27th

AEDs: An Easy But Largely Unknown Way to Save a Life

Sudden cardiac arrest -- when, without warning, the heart instantly stops beating -- kills 350,000 Americans of various ages and occupations a year, according to the American Heart Association.

Yet now, with high school sports teams in intensive training for their fall seasons, now is when we are most aware of these fatalities because of a tragic drama: A young athlete in peak condition, who has never flunked a physical or shown the faintest symptom of cardiac problems, suddenly collapses.

Death is usually all but instantaneous -- but it is not necessarily inevitable, not if a device called an automated external defibrillator, or AED, and someone willing to use it are close at hand.

Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack, which usually is caused by blocked arteries and often gives some advance warning. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the electrical impulses that control the heart suddenly misfire.

August 26th

Despite Law, AEDs Are Few and Far Between in Memphis

While new buildings that hold at least 300 people are required to have AEDs, existing places like grocery stores, restaurants and theaters don't have the lifesaving equipment.

 

MEMPHIS, TN--Strange as it may seem for two men whose hearts had abruptly stopped beating, but Kenneth Richmond and George Turner consider themselves lucky.

Bystanders Intimidated by AEDs

Devices are easy to use; give victims best chance at life

What could you do if you saw someone collapse in sudden cardiac arrest, a condition in which the heart stops beating and which can kill in minutes?

Calling 911, checking for breathing and a pulse, starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) -- all are part of the chain of survival. But the real difference between life and death for most cardiac-arrest victims is the availability and use of an automated external defibrillator, or AED.

Numerous studies show that not only are most bystanders unfamiliar with the portable, battery-powered devices and their locations, but many emergency dispatch centers and paramedics don't know where all the devices are.

Using Drones to Deliver AEDs to Cardiac Arrest Victims

A German technology non-profit has put together an autonomous octocopter that can carry a defibrillator, aiming to get to patients faster than an ambulance. Fredrich Nölle from Definetz presented the system in the town of Halle in North Rhine Westphalia. It's optimized for remote areas, and allows emergency services or the public to call a defibrillator in though a smartphone app that automatically sends GPS coordinates.

AED Laws Cause Confusion

Patchwork of Regulations Discourages Use of AEDs

There is no dispute that portable defibrillators, simple-to-use device that supply jolts to shock a stilled heart to beat again, could save tens of thousands of lives a year in this country alone if they are accessible to willing bystanders.

But across America, there is anything but agreement among states about rules for the use of automated external defibrillators (or AEDs): Where they must be located; if they should be registered so authorities know where they are; whether a business that installs one is fully protected from liability; or even if a company is obliged to use one if someone on the premises suffers sudden cardiac arrest.

And some experts say the uneven patchwork of laws and regulations is a worrisome barrier to more widespread distribution and use of the battery-powered devices, which, if employed within minutes of cardiac arrest, can bring a person back to life.

AEDs: Little Known, Seen

AEDs could save 20,000 cardiac arrest victims a year if locations known, public aware

Michael Abt, a 12-year-old middle-schooler from Vero Beach, Fla., Josh Miller, a high-school middle linebacker from Barberton, Ohio, and Connecticut lawyer Michael Sage, 29, all died when their hearts suddenly stopped beating.

But though their hearts also abruptly went still, Mary Tappe, a 45-year-old executive from Denver; Richard Strain, a financial officer from Canton, Ohio; and Claire Dunlap, a 15-year-old high-school softball centerfielder from Boynton Beach, Fla., survived.

August 25th

New Implanted Defibrillator Works Well Without Touching Heart

Study Highlights:

  • A new type of defibrillator implanted under the skin can detect dangerously abnormal heart rhythms and deliver shocks without wires touching the heart.
  • In a six-month study, the defibrillator surpassed FDA goals for safety and effectiveness.
  • The device received FDA approval in 2012 but still requires long-term study.

DALLAS--A new type of defibrillator implanted under the skin can detect dangerously abnormal heart rhyt

Q&A: How to Use an AED to Save Someone in Cardiac Arrest

The following information was compiled by Scripps Howard News Service. Additional facts may be found may be found here.

What is sudden cardiac arrest? 

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. SCA occurs because of problems with the heart's electrical system, which signals the heart to contract and pump blood. When this system misfires, abnormal heart rhythms result. The heart simply twitches and can't pump blood. 

August 24th

Uniformity in Regulations Needed for AED Laws

There is no dispute that portable defibrillators, simple-to-use device that supply jolts to shock a stilled heart to beat again, could save tens of thousands of lives a year in this country alone if they are accessible to willing bystanders.

But across America, there is anything but agreement among states about rules for the use of automated external defibrillators (or AEDs): Where they must be located; if they should be registered so authorities know where they are; whether a business that installs one is fully protected from liability; or even if a company is obliged to use one if someone on the premises suffers sudden cardiac arrest.

And some experts say the uneven patchwork of laws and regulations is a worrisome barrier to more widespread distribution and use of the battery-powered devices, which, if employed within minutes of cardiac arrest, can bring a person back to life. 

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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