Archive - 2012

Archive - 2012

October 6th

They don't always work, but at least they are starting to show up on the sideline

High school football player dies after collapsing during game

WYFF Greenville

Rouse was given CPR and shocked with a defibrillator before the ambulance arrived to take him to the hospital. Players and coaches from both sides prayed as medical personnel tended to Rouse. Hartsville was hosting Crestwood.

_______________________

It's tragic that this player died, but not all sudden cardiac arrest victims come back. The positive aspect of this tragedy is that the authorities had an AED at the game. Ten years ago, you would have had a very difficult time finding an AED at a high school sports event.

October 4th

Post University Runner Dies After Collapsing at Meet

WATERBURY, CT - A 20-year-old Post University student has died after collapsing during a cross country meet last month.

“It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of student-athlete Rob Roman, who died at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia this morning after he collapsed on Saturday, Sept. 22, during a cross country meet,” Post University President and CEO Dr. Tom Samph said in a news release issued on Friday morning.

Roman, of New York, was a business administration major in his second season with the cross country and men’s basketball programs, according to Post. He died on Thursday night.

Innovative Heart Defibrillator Offers Alternative for Regulating Heartbeat

OTTAWA – A new ground-breaking technology was recently used at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI) where two cardiologists, Dr. David Birnie and Dr. Pablo Nery, implanted a new innovative leadless defibrillator, the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD), to a 18-year-old patient. Under Health Canada’s special access program, this was only the third time this new type of ICD had been implanted in Canada.

October 3rd

Quick-Thinking Coach, AED, Save High School Basketball Player

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.--Excited to be on Central High School's basketball team, freshman Hunter Helton was looking forward to another conditioning practice Monday after school.

But during the practice, Hunter, 14, suffered sudden cardiac arrest and woke up hours later at East Tennessee Children's Hospital (ETCH).

"I didn't know anything," he said.

Hunter has his basketball coach, Jon Higgins, a former University of Tennessee basketball player, to thank for waking up at all, Hunter said. When his heart stopped, Higgins performed CPR and used an automated external defibrillator to revive Hunter.

October 2nd

October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month. The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Urges the Public to Learn CPR and How to Use an AED.

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the U.S. More victims could survive with greater public awareness and education and more widespread deployment of automated external defibrillators. Donations to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation on Wednesday, October 3 through Pittsburgh Gives will be used to help raise awareness about this public health crisis and the simple things anyone can do to save a life.

October 1st

Cardiologist Speaks Out on SCA in Youth

CHICAGO, Ill.--It's always tragic when someone dies suddenly. But when such an unexpected event happens to a seemingly healthy child or young adult, it's especially devastating.

While such fatalities are extremely rare, the warning signs and symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) can often go undetected for years — and young athletes are especially vulnerable. With the fall sports season in full swing, we turned to Dr. Joseph Marek, a Downers Grove-based cardiologist with Midwest Heart Specialists-Advocate Medical Group and a member of medical advisory board of Parent Heart Watch. The Glencoe-based nonprofit will be holding a fundraiser Saturday at the Chicago Theatre, produced and directed by former ESPN Radio Chicago General Manager Bob Snyder, who lost his 17-year-old daughter to SCA in 2008, while she was playing soccer. 

Q. What is SCA?

September 28th

Cardiac Arrests in Schools Usually Affects Adults, Not Students

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Student athletes collapsing from cardiac arrest in the middle of a game may grab headlines, but when someone's heart gives up at a school, it's usually not a youngster's.

In a new five-year study, researchers from Michigan found that only two out of 47 cardiac arrests at K-12 schools occurred during sports events. In fact, as many as a third of cases happened after 5 pm and mostly in adults.

"Schools are community-gathering places, and two-thirds of our cases were adults," said Dr. Robert Swor, an emergency physician at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine in Royal Oak.

His findings, based on registries and interviews with bystanders and school officials across the country, show that fewer than two out of every 1,000 cardiac arrests overall happen at K-12 schools. Sixteen of the 47 cardiac arrests at schools involved minors.

professor of medicine,cardiologist

This important comment is intended to Norman S.Abramson,MD,the chairman of SCA,and Susan Koeppen-a bold survivor of SCA,but committed to reduce SCA by promoting AEDs everywhere...please reffer this comment to them-I do not have their emails.

September 27th

FDA Approves First Subcutaneous Heart Defibrillator

Photo courtesy of Boston ScientificThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a heart defibrillator that helps to restore regular heart rhythms with leads that can be implanted just under the skin (subcutaneously) instead of connected directly into the heart. An implantable defibrillator is a small battery-powered device that constantly monitors a person’s heart rhythm and can deliver a therapeutic dose of electricity to restore the rhythm when it senses the heart is beating dangerously fast (tachycardia) or chaotically (sudden cardiac arrest). 

September 26th

University of Ottawa Student Recovering from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Paramedics and the University of Ottawa are crediting quick-thinking bystanders and a public defibrillator for helping a young man who suffered a cardiac arrest on Tuesday afternoon.

The 23-year-old was studying on the third floor of the university's Montpetit Hall at about 2:15 p.m. when his heart stopped.

Other students, staff and campus safety officers rushed to help.

A student nearby used an emergency phone to call security, who called 911. Over the phone, an emergency dispatcher gave CPR instructions to the group.

A public defibrillator unit was then found in a nearby lab.

"They administered one shock and then one of our paramedics arrived on scene and administered another. They continued CPR and after a third shock was delivered, he had a spontaneous return of pulse and was breathing on his own," said paramedic superintendent Stephanie Logan.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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