Archive - Sep 2012

Archive - Sep 2012

September 7th

A Hero’s Perspective on Saving a Life

Liz on the court

Terry Smith, Aurora, IL - hero to Liz Pearlman (Liz's story)

"It wasn't the first time I did CPR. So, I had a little bit of background with it. But not with someone as fit and young as Liz!" Terry said emphatically. It was first day of basketball practice, Terry was head athletic trainer and knew Liz well. He had them do a bit of extra running at the end of the session.

"It was strenuous, but there was nothing that day that would make you think anything was wrong," Terry explained.

He watched them finish up the last run, and saw Liz lay down in the middle of the court. He felt like walking over and saying "Come on getup, Pearlman!" but something wasn't right. Instead, Terry noticed that her face was odd, and she was taking strange, deep breaths. He went over for a closer look, with some foreboding.

Childhood Friendship Lives On

Brett Kuhn

Brett Kuhn, Mt Pleasant, MI – 18 at time of event (2010)

Brett and Chris have been buddies from a young age. They have had their differences, over football that is. Brett was a Chippewa (Central MI) and that day they were playing the Broncos (Western MI). Chris is a Spartan (MI State) but that didn’t stop him from saving Brett’s life later that night in an unusual emergency. A fit and healthy eighteen-year-old track and field star isn’t supposed to drop down dead at an after game party!

Third Time's A Charm

When Erin Cancro dropped off her daughters at school Thursday morning, it hit her just how close she had come to losing her father.

That's because her dad, Peter Clarke, 61, of Smithtown, had collapsed in cardiac arrest during drop-off Wednesday morning at Trinity Regional School in East Northport -- only to be saved by two off-duty police officers, an off-duty firefighter and a school nurse using an automated external defibrillator.

That defibrillator was hanging on a wall within arm's reach of where Clarke collapsed face-first onto the floor. The emergency responders -- Northport Village police Officer Pete Howard, MTA police Lt. Alex Lindsay and Greenlawn Fire Department advanced life support provider Mario Geddes -- all were dropping off their children and stood within feet of Clarke.

September 5th

Defibrillator "A Beautiful Thing" Says AED Advocate

In the eyes of Karen Acompora, the use of a defibrillator to save the life of a Smithtown man who went into cardiac arrest at an East Northport school reaffirms her family's advocacy for AEDs in schools, and is further testament to her son's legacy.

Acompora said the latest save brings to 62 the number of such stories she's collected since the implementation in 2002 of Louis' Law, named for her 14-year-old son who died two years earlier playing lacrosse. A goalie wearing the required chest protector, Louis Acompora was hit in the chest by a ball, which caused him to go into cardiac arrest. There was no defibrillator on the scene.

September 4th

Don't stop too soon!

Prolonged CPR Holds Benefits, a Study Shows

Ashley Gilbertson for The New York Times
Staff members at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn in 2010 trying to revive a patient who suffered a cardiac arrest.
By RONI CARYN RABIN
Published: September 4, 2012

When a hospital patient goes into cardiac arrest, one of the most difficult questions facing the medical team is how long to continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Now a new study involving hundreds of hospitals suggests that many doctors may be giving up too soon.

The study found that patients have a better chance of surviving in hospitals that persist with CPR for just nine minutes longer, on average, than hospitals where efforts are halted earlier.

There are no clear, evidence-based guidelines for how long to continue CPR efforts.

Study: Prolonged CPR May Be Beneficial

When a hospital patient goes into cardiac arrest, one of the most difficult questions facing the medical team is how long to continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Now a new study involving hundreds of hospitals suggests that many doctors may be giving up too soon.

The study found that patients have a better chance of surviving in hospitals that persist with CPR for just nine minutes longer, on average, than hospitals where efforts are halted earlier.

There are no clear, evidence-based guidelines for how long to continue CPR efforts.

The findings challenge conventional medical thinking, which holds that prolonged resuscitation for hospitalized patients is usually futile because when patients do survive, they often suffer permanent neurological damage. To the contrary, the researchers found that patients who survived prolonged CPR and left the hospital fared as well as those who were quickly resuscitated.

September 2nd

aaarrrrrrrrrgh!

I wish I could reach all the newspaper and television reporters. Many say or write "heart attack" when what they mean is "cardiac arrest."

Why is this a big deal? Both are true medical emergencies, and both require bystander intervention for survival, but each is treated differently.

Most people don't die of heart attacks, unless the heart attack leads to a cardiac arrest. A cardiac arrest happens when your heart stops beating and you stop breathing. You are clinically dead. Many cardiac arrests are caused by severe heart attacks, and many are not.

A cardiac arrest is an electrical problem. A heart attack is a plumbing problem. You don't do CPR for a heart attack. You don't use therapeutic hypothermia for a heart attack.

If you see someone having a heart attack, you call 911, you let the victim assume whatever position is most comfortable, you give the victim an aspirin to chew, and you do not let the victim eat or drink anything.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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