Archive - Sep 2012

Archive - Sep 2012

September 21st

So how does this example of 30% of arrests differ from the other 70%?

Longview student collapses at basketball practice
A student collapsed and briefly stopped breathing during an open basketball practice at Mark Morris High School in Longview.
The Associated Press

LONGVIEW, Wash. —
A student collapsed and briefly stopped breathing during an open basketball practice at Mark Morris High School in Longview.

A coach and parent gave CPR Sunday to 16-year-old Spencer Best of Longview until paramedics arrived and used a heart defibrillator.

His father, Rich Best, told The Daily News (http://is.gd/fRM2vn) Spencer will remain in intensive care for a couple more days this week at Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emmanuel Medical Center in Portland.

He says Spencer is alert and communicating. He says the men who gave him CPR saved his life.

---

Information from: The Daily News, http://www.tdn.com

How does this differ? Somebody did something before the ambulance got to the scene.

CPR + Prompt Defibrillation Really Works - at least ten times better than not doing anything!

A Tucson woman saves her husband with hands-only CPR
Posted: Sep 21, 2012 11:21 AM by Ryan Haarer
Updated: Sep 21, 2012 11:21 AM
KVOA.com

TUCSON- With over 380,000 cardiac arrests every year only about 70 percent of people know how to do CPR, according to the American Heart Association.

Recently a Tucson family had quite a scare. E.J. Marx felt chest and arm pain during a soccer game. His wife Whitney got him and their infant son Kahn into the car. On the way to the hospital, E.J. went into cardiac arrest.

Whitney handled the situation perfectly. She called 911, pulled E.J. out of the car and began chest compressions. She continued until emergency responders arrived.

E.J. spent two weeks in a coma, but is thankful his wife knew what to do, as it probably saved his life.

September 20th

Thin Placenta Might Be Linked to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Later in Life

 

Reduced nutrients, impaired development of fetus may raise risk in adulthood, study suggests.

Being born to a mother with a thin placenta -- the organ that nourishes the fetus -- may increase the chances of developing sudden cardiac death as an adult, new research suggests.

"People [born to mothers] with the thinnest placentas were twice as likely to have sudden cardiac death," said study author Dr. David Barker, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Oregon Health & Science University.

The report is published online Sept. 19 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Up to 5 million people a year worldwide die of sudden cardiac death, according to study background information.

September 8th

From WFTV: the best SCA vs AMI explanation I've seen in the media - too often they write "heart attack" when they mean SCA.

Cardiac Concerns: Saving Kids from Sudden Death

FLORIDA — WHAT CAUSES SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST:Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. If this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. SCA is not the same as a heart attack. A heart attack occurs if blood flow to part of the heart muscle is blocked. During a heart attack, the heart usually doesn't suddenly stop beating. SCA, however, may happen after or during recovery from a heart attack. People who have heart disease are at higher risk for SCA. However, SCA can happen in people who appear healthy and have no known heart disease or other risk factors for SCA. Certain diseases and conditions can cause the electrical problems that lead to SCA. Examples include coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease; severe physical stress; certain inherited disorders; and structural changes in the heart. (Source: nhlbi.nih.gov)

September 7th

I’m Much Safer Now.

Evan Piekara

Evan Piekara, Queens, NY – 24 at time of event (2008)

Teach for America* nearly lost one of their stars. Just one month after his 24th birthday, Evan collapsed on the St John’s University basketball court. He’d had a trying month, twenty days straight without a break, and this was his first day off. It became a longer time-out than planned.

That July afternoon he fell to the ground after a particularly satisfying basket. Everyone stopped and stared. Someone thought to call security. Steve Ptacek arrived in minutes and brought an AED with him. He started CPR since Evan had no pulse, and wasn’t breathing, just making a strange gasping sound. The AED could not restore a rhythm. Evan was dying. Fit, healthy and energetic, this young man was slipping away and yet everything possible was being done to save him.

Master Swimmers Don't Die…

Brian Duffield

Brian Duffield, Tucson, AZ – 40 at time of event (2006)

Brian is a member of a US Masters Swimmer group. There are about forty of them in Tucson that get together regularly and swim their hearts out at the University of Arizona pool. Well, on this particular Tuesday morning Brian nearly did! About half way into the session he didn’t feel at all well, and got out of the pool with an unusual fatigue. He decided to finish for the day and shower. That was when his chin hit the floor. He doesn’t know anything about it as he was unconscious at the time. Luckily, a young lad witnessed the fall and raised the alarm.

Circle of Life That Nearly Wasn’t

Liz Pearlman

Liz Pearlman, Aurora, IL – 20 at time of event (2009)

What would you like for your 21st birthday? How about a wearable defibrillator? Liz had to wear one for three months, think of a bullet-proof vest, add a canteen sized battery and you get the idea. Why would she need or even want that? A few weeks earlier, she had been practicing for the varsity basketball team and doing a “circle of life” sprinting exercise to earn her jersey. She had five seconds to go and suffered a cardiac arrest.
“I was on my back and Terry Smith [the athletic trainer] said ‘Get up!’ Then he saw my eyes roll into the back of my head. He immediately started CPR,” Liz said. “And, he called for an ambulance and an AED, which we had right outside our gym.”

The Team Rules, OK!

Kayla Burt

Kayla Burt, Portland, OR - 20 at time of event, 2002

It was New Years Eve, and her basketball team was staying over to celebrate. But Kayla never saw the festivities. She had freshly brushed teeth, and a brush with death. Loree Payne, her best friend, watched Kayla fall face down between the bed and the TV—they all thought it was a joke. But it wasn’t. None of her teammates knew CPR, but they’d seen it on TV. How hard could it be? Someone called 9-1-1, and luckily the operator gave instructions on the correct technique. The EMTs were there within minutes. Kayla is proud that she lived in Seattle. That city is the best in the country for cardiac arrest survival, chiefly because of their Medic One program.

A College Student’s Story of Survival

Paula Milliner

Paula Milliner, Indianapolis, IN – 20 at time of event (2004)

For most college students facing their 21st birthday, plans for celebration and exciting thoughts for experiencing new places and people are the common theme. Unfortunately in my case, thoughts of survival and whether I was ever going to maintain a normal lifestyle at 20 were at the forefront of my contemplations. At the age of 15, I was diagnosed with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, a disease that is rare to most, but commonly runs in my family. Like most young teenagers I didn’t really think anything of it or that it would actually have a significant effect on my life. Surely, it wouldn’t put me in the hospital until I was in the 60’s.

A Determined Chef Who Can’t Stay Down

Champion Chef

Doug Chrisman, 18, Hyde Park, NY – 18 at time of event (2008)

Monday morning, 7:30am, Doug was busy skimming the stock in preparation for that day’s class. The stock didn’t make it. Doug did. His classmates at the CIA (The Culinary Institute of America that is) saw the freshman from Missouri collapse, and one of them ran to get the nurse. The chef called the Safety Office and an AED was immediately brought to the scene. Doug was unresponsive and his pulse had disappeared, his face was turning blue — they only had minutes before he would die. In a text book case of the “Chain of Survival”, 9-1-1 was called, CPR started, and the AED used within just a few minutes.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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