Archive - Aug 2012

Archive - Aug 2012

Date
Type

Cardiac Arrest in Young More Common than Thought.

Cardiac arrest is relatively rare in young people, but it may be more common than experts have thought, according to a new study.

Using 30 years of data from King County in Washington, researchers found that the rate of cardiac arrest among children and young adults was about 2.3 per 100,000 each year.

That's not a big risk. But the figure is substantially higher than the "widely accepted" estimate for young athletes (not just young people in general), said senior researcher Dr. Jonathan Drezner.

According to that estimate, one in 200,000 young athletes (up to age 35) suffers cardiac arrest each year.

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops pumping blood to the rest of the body. It is fatal within minutes without immediate treatment.

August 30th

Sage Stallone: Was It Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

Coroner's Report Rules Death from Heart Attack*

Sage Stallone's cause of death has been the subject of scrutiny and investigation since he was found dead in his home on July 13, but now TMZ has obtained the L.A. County Coroner's report which states the 36-year-old actor died from a heart attack.

Coroner Chief Craig Harvey told the Los Angeles Times that Stallone died of natural causes and the toxicology test came back "negative except for a sub-therapeutic level of hydrocodone," -- though the drug played no role in his death.

According to Harvey, Sage was a heavy smoker and the habit likely helped contribute to his death, as smoking is one of the chief causes of heart disease due to elevated blood pressure, increasing the risk of clots.

When does the timer start?

The timer starts when the victim arrests. Period. It doesn't start when you call 911, it doesn't start when the ambulance gets there. I starts when the victim dies.

Please don't ever wait for the ambulance to get there. The result is overwhelmingly going to be bad if you wait.

I'm not talking about your seeing some random, sketchy stranger go down. The far more likely scenario is that when you see an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest, it will be a family member, a friend, or an acquaintance. Learn what to do. Better yet, learn what to do and get a personal use AED because two thirds of all cardiac arrests happen in the home, and immediate CPR + prompt defibrillation can change the average home survival rate from 2% to 75%..

If you cannot take an AHA or an ARC course right away, go to www.slicc,org, click on the For Past Trainees link in the left column, and download the class video and watch it. - and then take the AHA or ARC course when you can.

Do it now, PLEASE!

Discover Your Peers and Find Support at the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Network

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation has launched a new online community for sudden cardiac arrest survivors, people who have lost someone to SCA, their families, and other advocates. The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Network™ is a virtual meeting place where members can find support and information and "pay it forward."

Pittsburgh, PA (PRWEB) -- A new online community for people affected by sudden cardiac arrest—the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Network™ —has been launched by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation. The Network is targeted to survivors, people who lost a loved one to the deadly condition, and other community health advocates.

August 28th

SCA Foundation Website Named One of Top Five Online Destinations for Cardiac Information

SCA Foundation Joins Better Homes and Gardens HeartHealthyOnline.com as a 2012 Winner

Best Cardiac & Heart SiteThe Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation website, www.sca-aware.org, has been named one of five "Best of Cardiac & Heart Sites" by Pacific Medical Training (PMT), an online medical training company. PMT reviewed hundreds of cardiac websites before naming the five 2012 winners.

August 27th

Sudden Death Less Likely During or After Exercise

People whose hearts stop functioning during or shortly after exercising are three times more likely to survive than those who have cardiac arrest unrelated to working out, researchers said.

The Amsterdam Resuscitation Study looked at 2,517 cardiac arrest cases in the Dutch capital’s greater metropolitan area over a three-year period. Scientists found 145 of the patients were exercising during or within one hour of cardiac arrest and were mostly biking, playing tennis, working out at a gym or swimming, according to the research presented today at the European Society of Cardiology conference in Munich.

Back from the Brink: A Vest that Can Prevent Sudden Cardiac Arrest

PITTSBURGH--Last spring Jack Neilson survived sudden cardiac arrests one month apart, inspiring his recent visit to an O'Hara company with gratitude for saving his life during the second brush with death.

The first one -- a right-place-right-time circumstance -- occurred in an Elk County emergency room, where a defibrillator was used to resuscitate him.

The second time he was inside his Johnsonburg, Elk County, home -- a place where odds are high that a person won't survive a cardiac arrest because few homes have defibrillators or people trained to use them.

August 23rd

ICDs Boosted Survival in Real World Trial

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA--Real-world primary prevention using implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) conferred a significant survival benefit for patients at risk for sudden cardiac death, Canadian researchers found.

Among patients who had an ICD placed, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality was 0.46, according to Ratika Parkash, MD, from the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and colleagues.

In addition, after adjustment for factors such as age, drug therapies, ejection fraction, and propensity score, a significant difference in mortality remained, the researchers reported in the August issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Ocean City Soars into the 50% club!

If every rescue squad in the country had the same sudden cardiac arrest success rate that Ocean City's has had this summer, tens of thousands of lives would have been saved.

Since May 1, the Ocean City Fire Department, which is also the city's rescue squad, has successfully saved the lives of 50 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims, from resuscitating the victim on the scene using CPR and automated external defibrillators (AED) to transporting the victim to the hospital within the "golden hour"—the first 60 minutes being the most crucial with regard to saving a person's life after sudden cardiac arrest.

Just how high is a 50 percent save rate? Throughout the country the rate is at seven percent, according to Firefighter Ray Clark of the Ocean City Fire Department.

August 22nd

Major League Umpire, Singing Stayin' Alive, Helps Save Woman's Life

PHOENIX -- Jim Joyce's timing could not have been better. In fact, it was lifesaving. The veteran Major League umpire performed CPR on Diamondbacks food service employee Jayne Powers prior to the D-backs-Marlins game on Monday night.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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