Archive - May 14, 2012

Archive - May 14, 2012

UB Study Finds Method that May Predict Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk

BUFFALO, NY--Research by University of Buffalo (UB) cardiologists suggests that imaging for loss of nerve function in the heart may help identify patients who are at high risk of sudden cardiac arrest and therefore most likely to benefit from an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). ICDs are used to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in patients with advanced heart disease.

“Since many patients who suffer a cardiac arrest do not have severely depressed heart function, PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging may be able to identify high-risk individuals who could be considered candidates for an ICD,” says John M. Canty Jr., MD, Albert and Elizabeth Rekate Professor of Medicine, and the study’s principal investigator.

Largest Ever PET Study on Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Athlete's Sudden Deaths Expose Big Knowledge Gaps

When London marathon medical director Sanjay Sharma was called to attend someone who had collapsed with suspected cardiac arrest a mile from the finish line last month, he expected to find a man in his seventies.

"I had to hide my horror as I saw a young, athletic woman," he says. "I had to... compose myself for a few seconds before we started resuscitation."

Lying on the ground was 30-year-old Claire Squires, whose sudden death, along with those of Italian footballer Piermario Morosini and Norwegian Olympic swimmer Alexander Dale Oen, has drawn fresh attention to shocking heart problems that bring down young, fit people at the top of their game.

The case of English Premier League footballer Fabrice Muamba, who collapsed on the pitch in front of a stadium packed with spectators last month, has similarly focused minds.

Parents: Beware of the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

INDIANAPOLIS -- The American Academy of Pediatrics is warning parents about the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in children. 

Pediatric sudden cardiac arrest kills nearly 2,000 people under the age of 25 every year, according to the AAP.

Dr. Randall Caldwell, director of pediatric cardiology at Riley Hospital for Children, says that screening children for heart problems early on can save lives down the road.

"If you take a look at those 2,000 patients (who died), about 56 percent are going to be related to a death from some cardiovascular problems," he said. "That's why we want to make sure we screen those children and take care of those type of problems."

Caldwell said Riley treats about 30 new children each week complaining of chest pain, but only about 3 to 5 percent of them are found to have a heart issue.

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