Archive - Feb 2012

Archive - Feb 2012

February 9th

Allegheny General Hospital Doctors Perform Innovative Treatment for Ventricular Tachycardia

Pittsburgh, PA (PRWEB) - Heart specialists at Allegheny General Hospital (AGH) have joined a select group in the country offering patients who suffer from the common and potentially deadly heart rhythm disorder ventricular tachycardia(VT) a new, minimally invasive therapy called epicardial VT ablation.

One of the leading causes of sudden cardiac death, VT is an abnormal, rapid heart rhythm that start’s in the heart’s ventricles and is caused by tissue that disrupts the heart’s electrical system. The condition makes the heart considerably less efficient and without treatment it can lead to heart failure and cardiac arrest.

iRescU AED Scavenger Hunt Winners to Be Recognized on Valentine's Day in NYC

 

Renewing That YMCA Membership?

Dan Grecoe, Andover, MA – 42 at time of event (2011)

It all started with a skiing accident. Knee surgery meant Dan was sidelined from all the sports activity he enjoyed. Finally he’d been given the green light to get back to running. Early Monday morning in September he went to the local YMCA with a friend to get back in shape. Just a little jogging on the treadmill, maybe some weights. Except they didn’t get that far.

February 8th

13-Year-Old Saves Mother's Life--to the Tune of Stayin' Alive

NORTHAMPTON, MA - As he performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on his mother, 13-year-old George Hamilton says he was driven by a Bee Gees song.

"I was kinda going, 'Stayin' alive, Stayin' alive,'" he said recently, mimicking the compressions he delivered to the beat of the 1977 disco classic.

The teen's efforts, paramedics say, helped save Claire Hamilton, who suffered sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) recently.

"I think it's really amazing that he had the presence of mind to do a quick check, realize it wasn't working, call 911 and follow their directions," said Claire. "I am really proud of him."

Amherst Fire Chief Walter "Tim" Nelson called the eighth-grader's effort's "critical. "Without him it falls apart because he was the only one there," Nelson said.

Study: Fainting a Factor in SCA

LONDON, Ontario – Up to 45,000 sudden cardiac arrests occur each year in Canada, and less than five percent survive. In some of these cases, the event cannot be explained by the presence of underlying heart disease. In order to identify people at risk of these unexplained cardiac events, a newly published study examined the presence of certain warning symptoms that are present in people who have been resuscitated from a cardiac arrest. The research found that over a quarter of unexplained cardiac arrests occurred after the patient had an event of fainting, known as syncope. Patients also had frequent chest pain and palpitations.

February 7th

Mr. Ryks, the answer to the implied question at the end is that the odds are more than 90% that she would have stayed dead.

Automated external defibrillator helps revive woman at Duluth airport
Bystanders used an automated external defibrillator and CPR to revive a woman who collapsed at Duluth International Airport on Sunday afternoon.

By: Steve Kuchera, Duluth News Tribune

The woman was waiting to go through security when she collapsed. Bystanders, including a nurse, couldn’t find a pulse or sign of breathing. A Transportation Security Administration supervisor ran to get one of the terminal’s automated external defibrillators.

AEDs are portable devices that, when attached to a patient, automatically
detect whether the person’s heart is beating irregularly. If so, the device instructs the user to administer an electric shock, which can spur an irregularly beating heart back into a normal, effective beat.

The nurse administered at least one shock and performed CPR until the woman became responsive.

Can you spot the one thing that would have increased his chances of getting out of the hospital with major brain function intact

Teamwork helped fallen 8th-grade Jessie Clark player after he collapsed
By Jim Warren — jwarren [at] herald-leader [dot] com

Posted: 12:12pm on Feb 7, 2012; Modified: 2:20pm on Feb 7, 2012

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2012/02/07/2059144/teamwork-helped-fallen-8th-gr...

Fayette County school district officials said Tuesday fast action by an athletic trainer, safety procedures that worked according to plan and some good fortune came into play after eighth-grader collapsed at a baseball conditioning drill Monday afternoon.
The Jessie Clark Middle School student, identified as Benjamin Highland, was reported in critical condition Tuesday morning at University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital. The incident occurred about 5:30 p.m. on the baseball field at Lafayette High School.

February 6th

Bystanders Use Airport's AED to Save a Life

DULUTH, MN - Bystanders used an automated external defibrillator and CPR to revive a woman who collapsed at Duluth International Airport on Sunday afternoon.

The woman was waiting to go through security when she collapsed. Bystanders, including a nurse, couldn't find a pulse or sign of breathing. A Transportation Security Administration supervisor ran to get one of the terminal's automated external defibrillators.

The nurse administered at least one shock and performed CPR until the woman became responsive.

When members of the full-time 148th Air National Guard Fire Department arrived on the scene, the victim was suffering a small seizure. The firefighters established an airway, gave her oxygen and stabilized her. After a few minutes, Duluth Fire Department personnel arrived to help until Gold Cross Ambulance came to transport the woman to Essentia Health St. Mary's Medical Center.

Maybe you can help me understand why.

What follows is a recounting of something that happens every day. But it almost always only happens when someone steps up and performs Bystander CPR.

Why is it that Bystander CPR is performed only one third of the time?

Seriously, I'd like to have your opinion. We're trying to fix the problem, and while almost everybody says "Hey. That's a good idea. I need to get trained." it's rare to find a population that is more than 35% trained, and only a third of the cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR.

Here's the story of another save.

Bob

_________

Lafayette General honored a Lafayette woman with the Making a Difference award for going above and beyond, giving life saving CPR to a jogger who had collapsed.

Monday, January 9th started as any other day for Gary Dodson. He went to work and then around 11:30 went home for lunch and was planning on continuing his normal routine.

February 4th

Skip getting trained & maybe your psychiatrist will be able to buy that new car.

BY MARSHA SILLS
Acadiana bureau
February 04, 2012

“I’m a living example: This is what knowing CPR can do.” Gary Dodson, who received CPR after a heart attack while jogging

LAFAYETTE — For years, Gary Dodson put off attending free bystander CPR training held annually at the Cajundome.

But that changed this year, he told a crowd gathered in the lobby of Lafayette General Medical Center.

“You can make a difference. … Everyone needs to know it,” he said.

And no one knows that better than Dodson, who suffered a sudden cardiac arrest Jan. 9 while jogging in Girard Park.

“My heart stopped,” Dodson said.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

SCA Newsletter

Sign Up with the SCA Foundation News in order to stay informed! (* required field)

Contact Us

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

724-625-0025

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
7500 Brooktree Road
Wexford, PA 15090

Copyright © 2019 Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

Web Design & Development, & Web Hosting By FastWebEngine