Archive - Nov 7, 2012

Archive - Nov 7, 2012

Date

Latest Technology for ICDs & Pacemakers - An Energy-Harvesting Device That Needs No Battery

ICD placement

University of Michigan researchers have found a way to avoid the need to replace an ICD or pacemaker due to battery expiration.

Their research has identified a way to use your own beating heart to power your device. Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor tested an energy-harvesting device that runs on piezoelectricity (electricity resulting from pressure), and were able to generate more than 10 times the power required by modern pacemakers. And, it is about half the size of batteries now used in pacemakers and includes a self-powering back-up capacitor.

Study: Women Do Not Fare As Well As Men with ICDs

Women are more likely than men to experience complications and to die within six months of getting an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, according to new research that looked at nearly 39,000 patients.

"Women, when they come for treatment, are much sicker in general," said study author Dr. Andrea Russo, a cardiologist at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University in Camden, N.J. "That may be one of the reasons why their results are different."

Russo is scheduled to present the findings Wednesday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting, in Los Angeles.

People More Likely to Die of Heart Related Issues in Winter

No matter what climate you live in, you're more likely to die of heart-related issues in the winter, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2012.

"This was surprising because climate was thought to be the primary determinant of seasonal variation in death rates," said Bryan Schwartz, M.D., lead author of the study.

Researchers at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles analyzed 2005-08 death certificate data from seven U.S. locations with different climates: Los Angeles County, Calif.; Texas; Arizona; Georgia; Washington; Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.

In all areas, total and "circulatory" deaths rose an average 26 percent to 36 percent from the summer low to the winter peak over four years. Circulatory deaths include fatal heart attack, heart failure, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

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