Survivor Stories

Survivor Stories

Brothers, Age 7 and 10, Perform CPR to Save Grandmother in Cardiac Arrest

It was a Saturday night and seven-year-old Grayson Wu said that he knew something was wrong with his grandma when he asked for a snack and she didn't answer.

"So I looked over and she was, like..." he said.

"Unconscious, on the couch," interjects 10-year-old Kian Wu, rolling his head back and opening his mouth wide to illustrate.

"She looked really dead," adds Grayson. "Spit was going back into her mouth. She was grunting a little."

All's Well That Ends Well

Shakespeare said, “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.” The Bard may have been right, but Frantzi Schaub took him a bit too literally.      

Without CPR and an AED, This Patriots Fan Would Have Died

Now the family is trying to find the military medic who helped save his life.

On November 26, after leaving the Patriots/ Dolphins game, my dad, Edward K. Casabian, Jr., 75, went into sudden cardiac arrest while boarding the Providence-bound train. He was with my cousin, Ed Patriquin, an obstetrician from Davis, California, and my 11-year-old son, Luke. After seeing several pre-season games over the years, this was Luke's first regular season game—something he had been angling for, for quite some time.

Seven Lifeguards, Including a Future EMT, Unite to Save a Life

Politics may make strange bedfellows, as the saying goes, but they have nothing on the diverse pairings sometimes seen when cardiac arrest occurs.

On June 27, 2015, 40-year-old seasoned professional, James Ross (J.R.) Bourne, was “kicking around” a soccer ball with his friend, Luis Sanchez, on Jacksonville Beach, Fla. when he suddenly collapsed in the sand.

It Really Helps to Be Around People Who Know About CPR and How to Use a Defibrillator

If Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) strikes, there are worse places for it to happen than the environment in which Gary Schiller, MD, found himself on December 6, 2015.

Gary was attending the national meeting of The American Society of Hematologists in Orlando, Florida, when, during a 5K race, he experienced “chest pains, loss of power and breathing problems.”  The last thing he remembers before losing consciousness is being asked by a colleague if he was able to get up. When there was no response to that question, his fellow medical professionals went to work administering CPR while another colleague retrieved an automated external defibrillator from the conference center and revived the 56-year-old, trim, athletic Schiller.

17 Years and Thriving

This week, Henry Jampel, MD, celebrated the 17th anniversary of his resuscitation at breakfast in Baltimore with two of his rescuers, David Brown, MD, and Allan Krumholtz, MD, and other friends. On May 16th, 2000, at the age of 44, and seven months after completion of the Ironman Triathlon World Championship in Hawaii, Henry had a cardiac arrest in the shower after a swim workout. After 27 minutes of CPR by four fellow swimmers, who all happened to be physicians, he was successfully defibrillated, a striking example of the exception that disproves the rule.

Survivor Pays It Back...10 Years Later

Alan Langman, Marc Goyette and Tim Dewhurst have been playing soccer together recreationally for more than 10 years.

The trio plays year round on 40-50 fields throughout the Puget Sound area so when the three of them prepared to play a game on Sept. 22 at Hartman Park in Redmond, things were no different.

But about 30 minutes into the game, Goyette saw Langman go down. Langman's knees buckled and when he fell, Goyette said he did nothing to protect himself, so he knew something was wrong.

Knowing the Signs and Reducing the Risk

Steve Englert’s link to Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a bit different from others featured on this site. Steve is not a survivor. He has not suffered an SCA.  He has not had to be rescued by heroes with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or an automated external defibrillator (AED.) Steve got involved with the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation because of his risk of SCA.

I Had the Sensation of Being Sucked Into the Earth

Bruce Benda, Pittsburgh, PA–52 at time of event (2014)

The old saw ‘ignorance is bliss’ applied when Hannah Benda, daughter of sudden cardiac arrest survivor Bruce Benda got word that her dad had suffered SCA at a golf outing at Laurel Valley Golf Club in Ligonier, Pennsylvania.

Here Comes the Bride

PITTSBURGH, PA--A new bride who graduated from Peters Township High School kicked off her high heels while still wearing her wedding gown and revived a woman Saturday who was found unconscious on a Pittsburgh bench.

Julie Stroyne, a trauma nurse at UPMC-Presbyterian hospital, said she revived the woman who was on a bench near Westin Convention Center on Liberty Avenue.

“That’s something I’ll never forget,” said Stroyne, who was walking at the time with her new husband, Andrew Nixon, from their wedding reception held at The Pennsylvanian at 1100 Liberty Ave.

“There’s no time off,” said the 2010 Peters graduate who was a tennis standout in high school.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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