SCA News

SCA News

Shock From Heart Device Often Triggers Further Health Care Needs

Study Highlights

Help Raise Awareness About Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Create a Short Video for a Chance to Win a Defibrillator

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation and the Citizen CPR Foundation are jointly conducting a video contest to raise awareness about the importance of bystander CPR and use of automated external defibrillators to help victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Entries for the video contest are due October 23, 2017.
 

Sudden cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. The sudden, unexpected, pulseless condition strikes about 1,000 people outside hospitals each day and less than 10 percent of victims survive.

Got AED? Check Out this American Heart Month Promotion

PITTSBURGH, PA--The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation and Enerspect Medical Solutions have joined forces to lead the AED Readiness Project, a national initiative to improve access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in locations that might otherwise lack opportunities to acquire the lifesaving devices.

Orange County Fire Rescue Launches Lifesaving Apps With Technology to Help Keep Hearts Healthy

UCF partnership encourages students and community members to get the apps and save a life

ORLANDO, FL--This Valentine’s Day, during American Heart Month, Orange County Fire Rescue partnered with the University of Central Florida (UCF) to launch two lifesaving apps - PulsePoint Respond and PulsePoint AED. The apps support first-responding agencies like Orange County Fire Rescue by encouraging CPR-trained citizens to respond to sudden cardiac arrest incidents as emergency crews are en route. The partnership to launch the technology at the University was a natural selection. In 2015, the UCF student body was devastated by the loss of Michael Namey, a student who collapsed on campus and later died after suffering a sudden cardiac arrest.

How Devices in Public Places Can Restart Hearts

Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops pumping blood. It can happen to anyone, at any time, and signs include sudden collapse and immediate loss of consciousness.

Unlike heart attacks, which are caused by a blockage in an artery to the heart, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions. This produces abnormal heart rhythms (called arrhythmias) that make the heart unable to pump blood, explains Oscar Tovar-Calderón, MD, a medical officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

If cardiac arrest does occur, rapid treatment with a medical device called an automated external defibrillator, or “AED” for short, can be life-saving.

AHA Releases Latest Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

DALLAS, TX -- There are more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) annually in the U.S., nearly 90% of them fatal, according to the American Heart Association’s newly released Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2017 Update. According to the report, the annual incidence of EMS-assessed non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in 2015 is estimated to be 356,500. Estimates also suggest 7,037 children suffer OHCA each year.[1]

Getting To The Heart Of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Olympic skater shares his heart-stopping experience and what you should know about new implantable heart devices

Even a fit and healthy professional athlete can suffer from sudden cardiac arrest—but a look at Olympic skater Paul Wylie’s story may help to shed some light on what you need to know about the latest advancements in implantable heart devices that protect against sudden cardiac arrest and treat other irregular heart rhythms.

Two Treatments Yield Similar Outcomes in Children After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

No differences in neurobehavioral function between children in two temperature treatment groups a year after suffering from cardiac arrest in a hospital setting

ANN ARBOR, MI -- Emergency body cooling does not improve survival or functional outcomes in children who experience in-hospital cardiac arrest any more than normal temperature control, according to a multicenter study led by the University of Michigan and University of Utah.

Whole body cooling (therapeutic hypothermia) involves strictly controlled lowering of a patient's body temperature below the normal range in hopes of reducing brain injury.

Current guidelines recommend using either therapeutic hypothermia or actively maintaining body temperature within the normal range. Researchers found that both treatments helped control fever and led to similar outcomes in young patients.

Texas Two Step: Save A Life Campaign 2017

Dr. Oz joins medical school students and others to save lives by teaching free, Hands-Only CPR during weekend event in 11 Texas cities

Researchers Find That Electrical Function May Be Restored In Damaged Heart Tissue

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA--A Dalhousie Medical School researcher has discovered that scar tissue, like that caused by a heart attack, can maintain electrical function in damaged regions of the heart.

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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