SCA News

SCA News

Closing the Cardiac Arrest Survival Gap

University of Iowa study examines racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest

Cardiac arrest—when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating—is fairly common among hospitalized patients, affecting approximately 200,000 patients in the U.S. each year.

Historically, the likelihood of surviving an in-hospital cardiac arrest was low—roughly one in eight patients would live long enough to be discharged. Among black patients, the survival rate was even lower than that of white patients, according to previous research.

My Kid Is In There, MRIs of Locked-in Children Confirm

Structural and functional MRI in children resuscitated after drowning pinpoints the site of anoxic brain injury to regions controlling movement, while providing strong evidence that networks controlling perception and cognition remain largely intact. In the not-too-distant future, it should be possible to target the area of injury with neuroprotective therapies — now being tested in animal models — when childhood drowning victims first arrive at the emergency room.

One in Four ICD Patients Need Reintervention Within Five Years

New registry data underscore the need for risk/benefit conversations with patients at the time of implantation, experts say.

After five years, approximately one in four patients treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) will require reoperation, a new study shows. And while the reoperation rate varies according to the device type and the age of the patient, the registry results suggest that complication and reintervention rates are higher than physicians and patients realize.

Longer Cooling Does Not Harm and May Even Help Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients

Eight out of 355 cardiac arrest patients who do not immediately wake up after hospitalization have benefited from being cooled down to a temperature of 33°C for as long as 48 hours. However, this does not provide researchers from Aarhus University and elsewhere with evidence to conclude that 48-hour cooling is preferable to the typical 24 hours when it comes to preventing brain damage. The level of uncertainty is too high and the difference too small to reach this conclusion.

Three U.S. Airports to Unveil American Heart Association Hands-Only CPR Training Kiosks

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