SCA News

SCA News

James Jude, MD, Who Helped Pioneer Lifesaving CPR at Johns Hopkins, Dies at 87

James Jude, MD, who helped pioneer the lifesaving technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation while he was a resident at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the late 1950s, died Tuesday in Coral Gables, Florida. He was 87.

CPR has been in practice in the United States since 1960, when Johns Hopkins researchers William Kouwenhoven, Guy Knickerbocker, and Jude published in the Journal of the American Medical Association the first data on the benefits of what was then called "cardiac massage."

One in Four Patients with Primary Prevention ICDs Experience Boost in Heart Function Over Time

Findings highlight dynamic nature of disease and need for ongoing risk assessment

A Johns Hopkins-led study of outcomes among 1,200 people with implanted defibrillators -- devices intended to prevent sudden cardiac death from abnormal heart rhythms -- shows that within a few years of implantation, one in four experienced improvements in heart function substantial enough to put them over the clinical threshold that qualified them to get a defibrillator in the first place. 

A report on the study, published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, reveals these patients had markedly lower risk of dying and were far less likely to suffer arrhythmia-terminating device shocks, suggesting their hearts had grown less prone to developing lethal rhythms.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Establishes Survivor Research Panel

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation has established a research panel for survivors of sudden cardiac arrest and their families. The Foundation has worked with multiple universities to facilitate research with survivors and family members. It is now embarking on a new research initiative in collaboration with StrataVerve Market Research. Together, they will study public awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and post-resuscitation quality of life. To participate in the research panel, join the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Network. Once you are registered in the Network, you will be invited to participate in research, as studies arise. To participate in our upcoming survey with StrataVerve, please register by August 28. Questions? Contact info [at] sca-aware [dot] org (subject: Survivor%20Research%20Panel) .

Heel-Only CPR: A Giant Step for Resuscitation?

Research has demonstrated the benefits of “hands-only CPR” or “continuous chest compressions,” as an approach that is easily learned and likely to increase bystander intervention in cases of sudden cardiac arrest, compared with traditional CPR, which includes chest compressions plus rescue breathing.

However, anyone who has given CPR knows it can be extremely tiring. Further, its effectiveness depends on quality (e.g., rate, depth of compression, leaning).

But what would happen if instead of compressing the chest using the heels of their hands, bystanders used the heels of their feet? Would chest compressions be more effective? Would rescuers have more endurance?

The Earlier The Better – Bystanders Save Lives With CPR for Cardiac Arrest

DURHAM, NC-- Sudden cardiac arrest kills an estimated 200,000 people a year in the United States, but many of those lives could be saved if ordinary bystanders simply performed CPR, a new study led by Duke Medicine shows.

The early application of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by an average person nearby, combined with defibrillation by firefighters or police before the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS), was the one intervention that substantially increased survival from cardiac arrest, according to findings reported by Duke researchers and colleagues in the July 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Studies Examine Use of Bystander Interventions for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Two studies in the July 21 issue of JAMA find that use of interventions such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators by bystanders and first responders have increased and were associated with improved survival and neurological outcomes for persons who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
 
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an increasing health concern worldwide, with poor prognoses. Shinji Nakahara, M.D., Ph.D., of the Kanagawa University of Human Services, Yokosuka, Japan, and colleagues examined the associations between bystander interventions and changes in neurologically intact survival among patients with OHCA in Japan. The researchers used data from Japan's nationwide OHCA registry, which started in January 2005.

African-Americans Face Twice the Rate of Sudden Cardiac Arrest, Compared to Caucasians

New study in medical journal Circulation also shows African-Americans with Sudden Cardiac Arrest are significantly younger and have higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension

LOS ANGELES, CA--Compared to Caucasians, African-Americans face twice the rate of sudden cardiac arrest, according to a new study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

The study's findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal Circulation, result from the first scientific analysis comparing the detailed medical history of patients of different races who were stricken by the usually fatal condition. Approximately 350,000 die every year from sudden cardiac arrest in the U.S.

Air Pollution from Wildfires May Ignite Heart Hazards

Exposure to fine particle air pollution during wildfires may increase risk for cardiac arrest and other acute heart problems, particularly in the elderly.

DALLAS, TX--Air pollution from wildfires may increase risk for cardiac arrests, and other acute heart problems, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Body Temperature Change May Trigger Sudden Cardiac Death

Scientists, including SFU professor Peter Ruben, have found that sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmia can be triggered by changes in body temperature. The study is published in the Journal of Physiology.

The soccer player who drops dead in the middle of a game, or the infant who dies during sleep is often a victim of arrhythmia. Sudden cardiac death has several causes, including inheritable mutations in our DNA affecting structure and function of proteins in the heart. Simon Fraser University professor Peter Ruben found when studying the proteins that underlie electrical signaling in the heart, and subjecting those proteins to conditions that are similar to the stress of exercise, in some cases, temperature can cause changes that trigger arrhythmia.

Government of Canada and Heart and Stroke Foundation Exceed Goal of Installing 2,000 AEDs in Recreational Hockey Arenas Across the Country

Over 2,500 installed in Canada as part of National AED Initiative

CALGARY, ALBERTA--Two events took place yesterday to highlight progress and proven success of the National Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Initiative, a partnership between the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF). 

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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