SCA News

SCA News

EMS Added a Telephone Coach and Bystander CPR Rates Nearly Doubled

WASHINGTON, DC--After Korea added a nationwide dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) program for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, rates of bystander CPR nearly doubled, according to the results of a study published online last week in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Impact of a Dispatcher-Assisted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Program and Location of Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest on Survival and Neurologic Outcome").

AHA Recommends Standards to Improve Dispatcher-Assisted CPR

Public Comment Period for Program and Metrics Open Through November 16, 2016

DALLAS, TX-- The American Heart Association – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease – published recommendations this month that set standards for timely and high quality delivery of dispatcher-assisted CPR, also known as telephone CPR (T-CPR). The recommendations are accompanied by performance goals to measure successful implementation by first responders.

Pittsburgh Premiere of Superior and Big Screen Debut of SCA Foundation Video A Success

PITTSBURGH, PA--During a Q and A session following a special screening of the feature film “Superior,” Director Edd Benda pointed out that the film, which had its Pittsburgh premiere at a Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation fundraising event, featured only one death scene—a mountain man suffers a cardiac arrest. Benda’s father, North Hills resident Bruce Benda, is a survivor of cardiac arrest so the irony was not lost on the audience of more than 60 moviegoers comprised of many survivors and their families.

Study Shows Light Beams Could Be Used to Terminate Lethal Arrhythmias

Researchers at the University of Bonn and Johns Hopkins University lay out the basis for gentle defibrillation

Two New Resuscitation Alliances Announce Decisive Goal to Increase Global Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates by 50 Percent

DALLAS, TX--A cohort of international health organizations, resuscitation leaders, and emergency medical systems that includes the American Heart Association (AHA) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease – today announced the establishment of the Global Resuscitation Alliance, declaring a bold goal of increasing cardiac arrest survival rates by 50 percent.

To support these efforts in the United States, the AHA, the Seattle-based Resuscitation Academy Foundation (RAF) and Laerdal Medical announced the creation of the Resuscitation Academy Collaborative. The Collaborative will identify and disseminate best practices to combat and reverse the global public health crisis of poor outcomes from cardiac arrest.

Defibrillators Could Save Many More Lives If Associated with Basic Life Support Education

ROME, ITALY--Automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) fail to save lives when the public does not have basic life support education, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2016. The study found that public access defibrillation (PAD) programs are unevenly deployed across France, with an obvious impact on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival rate.

“The survival rate of OHCA remains extremely low,” said Dr. Nicole Karam, an interventional cardiologist at the European Hospital Georges Pompidou in Paris, France, on behalf of the Paris Sudden Death Expertise Centre led by Professor Xavier Jouven.

Sudden Death in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Rarely Associated with Exercise

ROME, ITALY--Sudden death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is rarely associated with exercise, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr. Gherardo Finocchiaro, a cardiologist at St. George’s University of London, UK.(1) Nearly 80% of patients in the study had no symptoms and only one in five had been diagnosed with HCM before their death.

Traffic Accidents Increased by 50% in Patients with ICDs

ROME, ITALY--The risk of traffic accidents is increased by 50% in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) compared to age and gender matched controls, according to a Danish nationwide registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.

“Driving after ICD implantation is an area of great debate and concern for both doctors and patients,” said lead author Dr Jenny Bjerre, a physician at Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. “Our study provides contemporary data suggesting that the risk of motor vehicle accidents is in fact increased following ICD implantation when compared to controls.”

Researchers Create Model to Predict Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Based on 12 risk factors, researchers say risk for sudden cardiac arrest could be predicted.

PHILADELPHIA, PA--Each year more than 300,000 Americans will succumb to out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD) – the immediate and unexpected cessation of the heart’s ability to function properly – one of the leading causes of death in the United States. For the first time, a team of researchers led by Rajat Deo, MD, MTR, an assistant professor of Cardiovascular Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has developed and validated a prediction model to determine sudden cardiac death risk in adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This research is detailed in a paper published in Circulation.

Genetic Tests for Potentially Fatal Heart Anomaly Can Misdiagnose Condition in Black Americans

Genetic testing has greatly improved physicians’ ability to detect potentially lethal heart anomalies among asymptomatic family members of people who suffer cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death.

But a study from Harvard Medical School published in the Aug. 18 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine shows that over the last decade these lifesaving tools may have disproportionately misdiagnosed one cardiac condition — hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) – in black Americans.

HCM, which affects one in 500 people, is an often-asymptomatic thickening of the heart muscle that can spark fatal arrhythmias in seemingly healthy young adults.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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