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AEDs Save Lives, But AEDs in Hiding Are Rendered Useless

See Huffington Post blog here.

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) save lives threatened by sudden cardiac arrest. However even when the lifesaving devices are widely deployed, they are not always available when needed, according to a new study reported at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. To address the issue, the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation calls for 24/7 access to the lifesaving devices.

It works

The Short Version
An elderly male suffered a cardiac arrest at a meeting. Another elderly male began to perform manual CPR but quickly tired and was unable to continue. The other person present - who had recently read an interview with one of the authors of an article in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine regarding Heel Compression CPR began to perform Heel CPR. The victim's heart was restarted before the arrival of EMS.

That's the whole point of Heel CPR - when you cannot get down on the ground or you have a problem pressing hard enough on the chest to get adequate compression depth, consider an alternative: Heel CPR. Go to www.slicc.org/ClassVideo and click on the Adult CPR video.

Background

Memory

Hi, I'm trying to figure out how this thing works. I wanted to answer a question about memory after cardiac arrests. But had to register and now don't know where I am, sorry lol

MY MEMORY DRIVES ME NUTS!

Heart Attack vs. Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Understanding the Difference

Awake or Not Awake. That is the Question.

October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month. Understanding the difference between heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest could help save lives. One way to understand the difference between the two conditions is this distinction: The heart attack victim is awake and the heart is beating. In contrast, the sudden cardiac arrest victim is not awake and the heart is not beating. To survive sudden cardiac arrest, the victim needs immediate CPR and treatment with a defibrillator. [1]

Sudden unexpected cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. [2], affecting 326,200 people each year, including 6,000 youth [3]. On average, about 10 percent of victims survive, though nearly 40 percent survive when bystanders call 911, start CPR, and use automated external defibrillators, or AEDs, before emergency medical services (EMS) arrives at the scene. [4] 

Some things most bystanders don’t know about CPR…and why you need an AED in your home.

A heart attack is not the same thing as a cardiac arrest. Heart attack victims normally are able to talk and many are in pain. Cardiac arrest victims are non-responsive, clinically dead, and are not breathing normally – even though they might be gasping.

CPR is not used on heart attack victims. CPR is only used on SCA victims.

CPR does not re-start hearts – It tries to keep the heart muscle and brain alive, and it delays the transition from a shockable rhythm to a non-shockable one. This transition drops your chance of survival seven-fold. It takes an AED to re-start the heart, and sooner is a lot better!

Eighty-five percent of all cardiac arrests occur in a private residence. The witness, if there is one, is usually about the same age as the victim. Heel Compression quadruples the number of people who can perform guideline-compliant chest compression ("GC3’s") for ten minutes.

#HeartBucketList #ImpactEveryday

My next #heartbucketlist goal is out and it's AMAAAAZING! I'm looking for a few young women who want to spread the word about #heartability and make an #impacteveryday.

Join me May 30th, 2016 in Interlaken Switzerland, as I hike the Hardergrat Trail. Hardergrat is one of the most beautiful ridge lines in the world and I chose it for my #heartbucketlist goal because it truly elevates your senses to whole new levels. I've always said in order to take care of your body you have to challenge yourself and all your senses. This hike truly captures that challenge. And with a group of extraodinary women who want to feel their own heart beat in a whole new way while making an impact on the hearts of millions of other young women, this is THE trip.

PLEASE SHARE with friends and family. And for more info on what I am planning, follow the updates at: http://www.heartability.org/impacteveryday/

Why We Do What We Do

Someone recently wrote to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation and asked us why we do what we do. Why do we work so hard to raise awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and help save lives? Why don’t we just accept the concept of letting people die naturally when it is their time?

This question is thought-provoking, but troubling. Yes, sudden cardiac death may be a painless way to go. Still, victims could have many years ahead of them to enjoy their families and other loved ones. And, we suspect, they would prefer to be with them on earth for a much longer time.

Just think of the lifetime events afforded to survivors…getting to see a son’s college graduation, a daughter’s wedding, the birth of a grandchild, and traveling to new destinations.

Learn it Young and Remember it Forever

An ad was created by a Cape Town agency, Not Norm for Scouts South Africa (SSA), the biggest youth organization in South Africa. The group teaches children and young adults "leadership abilities, teamwork, self-motivation, commitment, perseverance, environmental and cultural awareness and strong values," among other things, according to their website. The powerful ad is set to the sounds of an all-encompassing ocean, while on the shore, an empty chair and a book move with a quiet breeze. There's no one else around, sans the two people in the water. Then, a faint high note sounds in the background, intensifying the video as a young boy, dressed in full clothing, carries a girl in a swimsuit out from the water.

Using his instincts, the boy performs CPR on the girl. And suddenly, the video cuts ahead to the boy, all grown up...

...To reveal that this scene, in fact, was between father and daughter.

Survivors, Share Your Selfies!

September 29th is World Heart Day. October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month. If you are a survivor of cardiac arrest, please consider sharing a photo of yourself holding the attached 8.5 x 11 inch sign, by either:

Please contact your legislators today

Your help is needed today to save the federally-funded Rural and Community Access to Emergency Devices Program. Designed to save lives from cardiac arrest, this program is in jeopardy of being terminated. The U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee proposes to end this life-saving program, but the U.S. House Appropriations Committee recommends $4.5 million for this initiative. Soon U.S. Members of Congress will work to resolve differences in the Senate and House health funding bills. So please send an e-mail to your U.S. legislators, urging them to include the House Appropriations Committee’s funding level of $4.5 million for this program in the final 2016 health appropriation bill. Funding for the Rural and Community Access to Emergency Devices Program is used to buy automated external defibrillators in bulk, place AEDs in public rural areas where cardiac arrest is likely to occur, and train first responders and lay rescuers in their use.

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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Contact Us

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

724-934-0034

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
7500 Brooktree Road, Suite 207
Wexford, PA 15090

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