SCAFoundation's blog

SCAFoundation's blog

What Are You Doing to Celebrate CPR-AED Awareness Week?

In late 2007, Congress declared the first week of June as “National Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Awareness Week.”

The Congressional resolution shines a national spotlight on how important it is for all Americans to learn critical lifesaving skills such as how to perform CPR, how to use an AED and the need to increase public access to AEDs.

House members Reps. John R. “Randy” Kuhl, Jr. (R-NY) and Dan Boren (D-OK) co-sponsored the House version of the bill (H.Con.Res. 215), and Sens. Russell Feingold (D-W) and Susan Collins (R-ME), championed the Senate version (S.Con.Res. 54), working with the American Heart Association and American Red Cross.

Last June, nationwide ceremonies, community activities and educational outreach efforts were conducted across the country.

What are you doing to celebrate CPR-AED Awareness week this year?

 

You Can Save a Life at School

A Message from the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation

We see it in the news far too often: A student is at football practice, or playing lacrosse, or just walking to class when he suddenly collapses and dies from sudden cardiac arrest.

When a tragedy like this happens, people often think there’s nothing they can do. But there is: Immediate treatment—before paramedics arrive—with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, and an automated external defibrillator, or AED, gives the victim the best chance at life.

Schools exist for the purpose of preparing young people for life. Doesn’t it make sense that schools themselves should be prepared to save a life?

Tim Russert's Legacy

The following letter from the SCA Foundation was published in The New York Times, Tuesday, July 1, 2008.

To the Editor:

Will the AHA’s Hands-Only CPR Advisory Help Improve Survival Rates?

Even though sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a preventable and treatable condition, most victims die because they do not receive effective help quickly enough. To survive SCA, it is critical for the victim to receive immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and treatment with a defibrillator within five minutes. Since even the best EMS responders cannot always get to the victim in time (typical EMS response times are seven to eight minutes after receipt of the 9-1-1 call), survival generally depends on the help of bystanders who witness the victim’s sudden death and intervene without hesitation.

To improve SCA survival rates, it is vital for potential bystanders to be aware that SCA is a public health crisis and that survival from SCA depends largely on bystander intervention. Lifesaving bystander actions include calling 9-1-1, giving CPR, and using an automated external defibrillator (AED).

SCA and Heart Attack: Understanding the Difference

It’s a common misconception that sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and heart attack are the same thing. In reality, they are quite different.

Understanding the difference could save your life—or the life of someone you love.

HEART ATTACK: A "PLUMBING PROBLEM”

The Person is Awake and the Heart is Beating

Heart attack (the medical term is myocardial infarction or MI) occurs when part of the heart’s blood supply is reduced or blocked, causing the heart muscle to become injured or die. The person is awake (conscious) and may complain of one or more of the signs and symptoms of heart attack.

Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack

Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back.

Why AEDs Should Go to School

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) happens to kids as well as adults. A simple device known as an automated external defibrillator (AED) can save lives, but only if it’s in the right place at the right time

We see it in the news nearly every day. A young student, frequently an athlete, dies suddenly from cardiac arrest. Soon after, the school system develops an AED program in memory of the student.

Why wait for a tragedy? Do schools in your community have AEDs? If they don’t the time to get them is now.

It’s not just the headlines about sudden death in young people that are causing an increased interest in school CPR-AED programs. People are beginning to recognize that sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death among adults in the United States—and it can also affect children and adolescents. And they’re starting to understand that there is a treatment for it: the quick combination of CPR and defibrillation.

Legacy of the Lost

Our children all died suddenly.
Their hearts just stopped one day.
One minute they were with us—
Then taken swift away.

We pray they are in heaven,
Just waiting for us there.
And though we know this in our souls,
The loss is hard to bear.

We never knew they were at risk—
We never thought to ask.
We trusted all authorities,
Not bringing them to task.

But now we know, and pain is deep—
So deep we can’t convey.
And though we try to move ahead,
We miss them every day.

So we’re harnessing our sorrow,
We’re channeling our pain—
So that their lives—so quickly lost—
Will never be in vain.

To save the lives of other kids
Is what we have to do—

Calling All Survivors!

Are you someone who beat the odds and survived sudden cardiac arrest? Would you like to help other victims survive? Join the SCA Survivor Registry™, the nation’s first online registry for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors.

By joining the registry you can find others who have been through similar life-changing events, share their experiences, and help one another in the healing process.

In beating the odds, a survivor has already joined a special and unique group of people. Their stories are eerily similar—a savior who performed CPR, a layperson or professional with a defibrillator, and an ICD implanted for life.

You will find they are eager to meet and talk with you, since you have become one of the family.

The Game

Dedicated to the guys who brought me back

A New Tribe: Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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Contact Us

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

724-934-0034

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
7500 Brooktree Road, Suite 207
Wexford, PA 15090

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