SCAFoundation's blog

SCAFoundation's blog

What to Know About Sudden Cardiac Arrest

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, based in Pine, recently published survey results showing that people are less concerned about heart attacks and episodes of cardiac arrest than they are about other, less deadly health problems. Few of the 1,200 people surveyed knew the difference between a heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest, estimated to be the third most-common cause of the death in the United States, after heart and disease and cancer, according to survey results. Mary Newman, the foundation's president and co-founder, provides more details below.

Why does sudden cardiac arrest get less attention than other leading causes of death and disability in the U.S.?

33 States Now Require CPR Training Before High School Graduation. What Are the Others Waiting For?

June 1-7 is National CPR-AED Awareness Week. It's time to start teaching all students CPR and how to use automated external defibrillators (AEDs) before high school graduation.

Flashback. It was 30 years ago. I was moving from New Jersey to Indiana and I only had a few days left before heading west. So I took a chance. Just before the big move, a friend drove me to the city to meet with an editor at PARADE Magazine. I wanted to write an article about the need to teach cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in schools. Widespread CPR training was then--and is now--a passion of mine. 

Join or Support Our Team Today!

Take a step for survival. Join the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation team at the Highmark Walk for a Health Community in Pittsburgh, PA, on May 14th. Can't walk with us that day? You can still support the team by donating here.

About 1,000 people experience sudden cardiac arrest every single day in the U.S., and most of them die. Those who do survive invariably received immediate CPR and treatment with a defibrillator. 

Is It Sudden Cardiac Arrest or Heart Attack? They’re Not the Same.

Understanding the Difference Could Save Your Life

Survivor Runs to Raise Awareness about Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Without any warning, in September 2015 I suffered from and luckily survived a sudden cardiac arrest. The DC Half Marathon (Rock & Roll DC) will mark six months from when I was discharged from the hospital. This year will be my third R&R DC and is very different from past years. Many of those 5-10% that survive an SCA aren't nearly as fortunate as I and often suffer from severe and life long motor, memory and many other neurological problems. This page is to raise awareness for  Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), for the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

Heart Attack Patients Are At Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest. But Ray's Story Brings Hope.

Ray 2. Death 0."

My recent blog described the difference between sudden cardiac arrest and a heart attack. One key distinction is that while the heart attack patient is awake and the heart is beating, the sudden cardiac arrest patient is not awake and the heart is not beating.

Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack, but the two conditions can be related: Heart attack patients face an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest. 

Join Us on #GivingTuesday

We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 1, 2015, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

Please consider a gift of $35 or more to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation on #GivingTuesday. Help support the Foundation's mission to raise awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and save lives.

To donate, click here.

Then tell everyone you can about how you are giving. Be a part of a global celebration of a new tradition of generosity.

AEDs Save Lives, But AEDs in Hiding Are Rendered Useless

See Huffington Post blog here.

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) save lives threatened by sudden cardiac arrest. However even when the lifesaving devices are widely deployed, they are not always available when needed, according to a new study reported at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. To address the issue, the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation calls for 24/7 access to the lifesaving devices.

Heart Attack vs. Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Understanding the Difference

Awake or Not Awake. That is the Question.

October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month. Understanding the difference between heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest could help save lives. One way to understand the difference between the two conditions is this distinction: The heart attack victim is awake and the heart is beating. In contrast, the sudden cardiac arrest victim is not awake and the heart is not beating. To survive sudden cardiac arrest, the victim needs immediate CPR and treatment with a defibrillator. [1]

Sudden unexpected cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. [2], affecting 326,200 people each year, including 6,000 youth [3]. On average, about 10 percent of victims survive, though nearly 40 percent survive when bystanders call 911, start CPR, and use automated external defibrillators, or AEDs, before emergency medical services (EMS) arrives at the scene. [4] 

Why We Do What We Do

Someone recently wrote to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation and asked us why we do what we do. Why do we work so hard to raise awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and help save lives? Why don’t we just accept the concept of letting people die naturally when it is their time?

This question is thought-provoking, but troubling. Yes, sudden cardiac death may be a painless way to go. Still, victims could have many years ahead of them to enjoy their families and other loved ones. And, we suspect, they would prefer to be with them on earth for a much longer time.

Just think of the lifetime events afforded to survivors…getting to see a son’s college graduation, a daughter’s wedding, the birth of a grandchild, and traveling to new destinations.

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Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

877-722-8641

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
7500 Brooktree Road, Suite 207
Wexford, PA 15090

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