Blogs

Blogs

Patient Care, Advocacy Are Powerful Bedfellows

Published first on EMS1

Jimmy Kimmel's story reminds us of the breadth of EMS' commitment to our patients

As a mom and an EMT with a similar story, I was touched by Jimmy Kimmel's emotional monologue about his newborn son Billy. With more than 10 million YouTube views, it’s a critical reminder of two underlying messages.

Monophasic vs. Biphasic Defibrillators

I was recently studying this article covering monophasic vs. biphasic technology in AED units and was struck by a few interesting points:

1) First defib type shock that saved a life took place all the way back in the 1940's and used metal spoons!
2) The biphasic tech allows for significantly less shock (joules) to be used in treatment do to the waveform.
3) The lower-level of required shock is what has allowed for the size of AEDs to shrink.
4) Multiple biphasic waveforms exist and are used by different manufacturers (per this article),

First time entry sca survivor

I experienced sca on April 1st, 2017 (not a great April's fool). I am type 2 diabetic . I suffered from a reaction to Metformin compounded by pneumonia that caused me to be dehydrated. After renal failure at home, cardiac arrest came next. Fortunately I was already in the ER and had an excellent team looking out for me.My physical recovery has been good. My vital numbers are stabilized. However, I am experiencing issues with short time memory and other cognitive issues. Any advice on mind exercises is appreciated. I will try to share my experiences here.

Wow, that scared me

Hello,
As mentioned in the my last post my cardiac arrest happened on Dec 11, 2011. I do not recall what if any feeling or sensation I had so, in a previous post, I asked if anyone cold tell me what if any feelings had been experienced when your cardiac arrest happened; hoping to be well informed.

Well, I have news... On April 20th, I had a near cardiac arrest. I have an ICD and after about 11 seconds it corrected my ventricular fibrillation and just seconds before the defibrillator would have shocked me. I know this because my bedside device (Merlin) alerted my doctor who called me to come into the office. He printed out the ekg of that evening and I saw where the ICD began the correction program and was charging to possibly give me a shock. I was only seconds away from that shock. Thank God, the ICD worked.

A SUBTLE ADVANTAGE FOR DRIVERLESS CARS

Driverless cars will be actively sold before the end of this decade.

Recent evidence shows that the accident rate with a driverless car is far less than with a human at the wheel.

One consequence is that, if the "driver" is wearing a device such as iBeat, the car can re-route and head for the closest ER when that passenger / driver is recently clinically dead.

Sure beats calling an ambulance.

Bob

Short term memory GONE

On Feb. 6, 2017 at 5:00 am in Walmart while looking at ham steaks I went down, Unconscious . Haven't a clue how long I was out but wound up in a heart hospital in Richmond, Va.
After two days I went home with a monitor the size of a cell phone and started transmitting to Pa 24/7 and where they in turn reported to my cardiologist here in Richmond daily. Received a call from the doctors nurse asking if I realized my heart stopped for four seconds a couple times. Arrangements were made for a pacemaker. 24 hours after receiving the pacemaker I went home.

hello

I'm struggling to make it by, I'm 22 years old and had sudden cardiac arrest last year
(February 10th, 2016? idk the actual day but I was told either that day or the following). I spent some time in a coma, I don't actually know how many days of that either but I know it was somewhere around a week and a half. I can't help but to wish everything would've just ended. Why did someone have to save me? My life seemed to be on a good track and now everything has fallen apart. I don't have any closure, and I'm in so much debt I don't know where to begin... I was told there there wasn't a cause, it just happened. I don't remember anything about it or leading up to it happening, i don't really know where my memory stops and picks up again but I know somethings I don't have any recollection of.
I have photos and conversations on my phone that are weird to look at. Like i'm looking at my own memories but they feel like they belong to someone else.

I feel like I should care more

Since my SCA episode happened January 17, 2016. I have outwardly seemed to be doing extremely well. My doctors tell me I am doing well, I feel decent and everyone loves to tell me how "good" I look. Inside, I continue to battle depression - that feeling of why did I not just go ahead and die? I mean it seemed like an easy way to leave this world as opposed to so many people I have watched die a slow painful death from cancer or other medical issues. Did I just set myself up to die one of these deaths in 10 years?

Ambulance call is a lifesaver not an embarrassment

Oh no. What’s that pain. Is it my heart? No, it couldn’t be.

It will pass. I could call 9-1-1. No. No ambulance. Can’t do that. The sirens. Neighbors rushing over. Too embarrassing. Maybe I’ll feel better later.

Regretfully, some people would rather die than call for an ambulance. So that’s exactly what they do.

Early symptoms are often ignored and puts people at risk for significant damage to the heart muscle, even death. Heart attacks have “beginnings” that can occur weeks before the actual attack. Be aware of pressure, not necessarily pains in the chest. Don’t try to rationalize it away as something else. Your body, like the engine in your car, is trying to tell you something is wrong.

Read the full article:
http://www.thewesterlysun.com/opinion/columnguest/9722832-154/guest-comm...

Hi! New to the group- but here's what happened to me

On may 16, 2014.. I woke up, at age 45 ( just turned- my birthday was April) put on my favorite suit to go to work. I thought I was in the best shape of my life, altho under quite a bit of stress. At 2:20 pm- I remember clutching my chest (my hear. Felt like it was out of control and spinning). I remember telling my coworker that "oh my god this can't be good" - next thing I remember was days later waking up in ICU of a cardiac specialty hospital. By the grace of god I worked in a hospital- a smaller community one- and dropped right in front of the respiratory office. 50 feet from the emergency room. It took 4 attempts at DEFIBRILLATING me. The doctor said if that happened even in the parking lot o would not have survived. I went back to work far too soon, as I work right in the same area it happened- plus my face required 17 stitches to piece my lips back together as well as knocking out my front teeth. At first I felt so lucky- like I was invincible!!!!

Syndicate content

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

SCA Newsletter

Sign Up with the SCA Foundation News in order to stay informed! (* required field)

Sign Up with the SCA Foundation News and stay informed!

* required field

*







*



Email & Social Media Marketing by VerticalResponse

Contact Us

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation would like to hear from you! If you have questions or comments — Contact Us!

877-722-8641

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
7500 Brooktree Road, Suite 207
Wexford, PA 15090

Copyright © 2017 Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

Web Design & Development, & Web Hosting By FastWebEngine