Archive

Archive

February 4th, 2010

Coroner Rules on Brittany Murphy's Cause of Death

The L.A. County coroner's office says actress Brittany Murphy died of pneumonia complicated by an iron deficiency, anemia and multiple drug intoxication.

Coroner officials said Murphy had gone into sudden cardiac arrest because of "drug intake," and the Dec. 20 death was classified as an accident. They said an autopsy report would be available in two weeks.

Murphy, 32, went into cardiac arrest at her home in the Hollywood Hills. L.A. firefighters responded to a medical call at about 8 a.m. at the home she shared with husband Simon Monjack in the 1800 block of Rising Glen Road.

Firefighters tried unsuccessfully to revive Murphy on the way to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead about two hours later.

Born Nov. 10, 1977, in Atlanta, Murphy moved to Burbank with her mother when she was 13. Her film break came in the movie "Clueless" (1995), in which she starred opposite Alicia Silverstone.

Niagara Region High School Students to Receive Lifesaving AED Training Program, High Schools to Receive AEDs

5,700 students will be trained annually to use Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs)

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Feb. 5, 2010) - The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is thrilled to announce that as a result of a unique new partnership between ACT, the Government of Ontario, FirstOntario Credit Union, and Heart Niagara Inc., more than 5, 700 Niagara Region high school students in 30 schools will be trained each year on the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This lifesaving training will help expand students' capacity to respond to cardiac emergencies beyond their CPR training.

February 2nd

Cardiac Science Notifies AED Customers of Voluntary Medical Device Recall

BOTHELL, Wash. -- Cardiac Science Corporation is initiating a worldwide voluntary recall after determining that approximately 12,200 automated external defibrillators (AEDs) may not be able to deliver therapy during a resuscitation attempt, which may lead to serious adverse events or death. These AEDs were manufactured in a way that makes them potentially susceptible to failure under certain conditions. The FDA has been informed of this situation.

This issue is separate from the Company's November 13 announcement regarding a voluntary medical device correction. Each of the approximately 12,200 devices affected in this recall can be confirmed at the Cardiac Science Web site at http://www.cardiacscience.com/AED195.

February 1st

Seven Signs That May Warn of a Rare Heart Condition

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As Americans look to keep
their fitness resolutions and increase their physical activity, Dr. Bing Liem,
cardiologist and electrophysiologist at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View,
Calif., is hoping to raise awareness of a critical but rare heart condition:
congenital malformations of the heart or vascular system, which is to blame for
the majority of sudden cardiac deaths in athletes under the age of 40.

SCA Foundation: Leading the Charge

WASHINGTON, DC-- The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation was featured in Cardiovascular Health, a supplement in today's Washington Post, as one of three nonprofit organizations making a difference in the prevention of death and disability from heart disease. Others recognized were the American Heart Association and WomenHeart.

"More people die each year from sudden cardiac arrest than from AIDS, Alzheimers, assault with firearms, breast, colon and prostate cancer, fires, motor vehicle accidents and suicides combined," Mary Newman, President, was quoted as saying.

"We are thrilled that the article 'Organizations Leading the Charge" will help raise awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and the importance of prevention and immediate bystander action," said Bobby Khan, MD, PhD, Chairman, Board of Directors.

January 25th

Labor Day Miracles

My name is Amy Jones.  I am 37 years old.  September 7, 2009 was the day my life changed forever. The first part of my story will be told from the recollection of others – the story may be incomplete because my husband, who is a major part in this story, does not like to talk about this. It is simply too painful. It is easier for me because I don't remember. I am almost a third party to the entire experience.

Pharmacological Fright

Michelle Bychowsky, Hoboken, NJ – 34 at time of event (2008)

Michelle Bychowsky

Michelle works for Novartis, she trained as a pharmacist, and now manages the drug supply for investigational trials. She was presenting during a meeting on that Wednesday, when she fell forward onto the table in front of her. 911 was called and several colleagues, who were also EMTs, hurried over to assist.
"I'd never met [them before] but now I keep in touch with them," she said.

Ewy's Mission: Saving Lives Using Continuous Chest Compressions


International resuscitation experts to consider recommending this protocol during meeting next week in Dallas


TUCSON, Ariz.–For more than two decades, Dr. Gordon Ewy
has been on a crusade to change the way people are treated for sudden cardiac
arrest, a leading cause of death in the nation.

Methodist University Hospital Expands Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia for SCA Survivors

MEMPHIS–A “cool” new treatment is responsible for saving the
life of 63-year-old Isaac Turner last December. “It saved him, no question,” said Bruce
Wilson, M.D., a cardiologist with Methodist University Hospital. Methodist
is the first hospital in West Tennessee to offer
therapeutic cooling therapy for cardiac arrest patients who meet particular
criteria.

Now

Methodist plans to implement cooling therapy in its other
three adult hospitals in the Memphis area, Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown
Hospital, Methodist North Hospital, and Methodist South Hospital. All four
hospitals are certified chest pain centers which brings high-level cardiac care
to patients in all corners of our community which is vitally important when
treating heart attacks.

January 23rd

NFL May Mandate Heart Ultrasounds

CHICAGO–In the wake of
Gaines Adams' death of a cardiac arrest Jan. 17, the National Football League (NFL) may mandate an
ultrasound of the heart at next month's NFL Combine. But NFL Players
Association medical director Thom Mayer warned the decision would not be an
indication of regret and insisted the use of echocardiograms have been
discussed for several years.

"It takes my
breath away," Mayer told the Sun-Times when asked about Adams' death.
"I've got kids of my own, his age, so anytime you hear that one of your
own is gone, it's devastating.

"But it
doesn't mean it was a mistake (not to mandate echocardiograms) up to this
point."

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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