Archive - Jan 2018

Archive - Jan 2018

Date
Type

January 27th

Spouse of Young Survivor

On August 1, 2014...My wife was just 36yrs old at the time of her Sudden Cardiac Death. Just five weeks earlier we welcomed home our third child. I was out of town for a new job and I encouraged her to load the kids up and head to her parents for help with the kids while I was away. She made it to her parents and that night at 1AM she suffered a cardiac death. Luckily she was up talking with her mother late into the night and there was a witness to the event. CPR was started and once EMS arrived they continued with CPR. She was shocked several times and finally a faint rhythm was found. Once in the hospital she fell into a coma and was on a ventilator. On the third day we decided to begin to ween her off the ventilator. As she began to get stronger and breath on her own, we decided to remove the propofol drip in hopes she'd regain consciousness. Propofol is quickly removed from the body so we expected signs of consciousness within about ten minutes.

January 23rd

My story

I am a 63 year old divorced male. I still work full time and enjoy playing tennis regularly.

On Tuesday evening 1 week ago, I was participating in my regular tennis group clinic, one hour of drills and then one hour of play. Near the end of the first hour, while in the middle of a volley drill, I felt faint (no other warning) and immediately passed out - it was Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). I awoke minutes later after being resuscitated by the EMTs (I was later told that the tennis staff used an AED and a friend administered CPR before the EMTs arrived). I remained fully conscious after that while being taken to the ER and admitted to the hospital. The next day I got an angiogram and the following day I got an ICD. I was discharged on Friday, but won't be able to return to work for 2 more weeks.

Four in 10 Cardiomyopathies – A Major Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death in Young People – Are Genetic

Family screening urgently needed to prevent early death in apparently healthy relatives

SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS--Four in ten cardiomyopathies – a major cause of sudden cardiac death and heart failure in young people – are genetic, according to a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) study published in European Heart Journal. Family screening is urgently needed to prevent early death in apparently healthy relatives, the paper says.

Cardiomyopathy is where the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick or rigid. As the condition worsens, the heart becomes weaker and less able to pump blood through the body and maintain a normal electrical rhythm. Around one in 300 people in Europe has a cardiomyopathy.

January 22nd

Another great SCA Survival Story

This is a very short post, but I came across this story today and thought it was worth sharing. While these types of stories aren't uncommon, I guess I appreciated the simple advice of getting CPR training. Obviously, it was awesome to hear about the successful outcome. I haven't had to go through that type of experience, but I can imagine how I would feel if I had to work through that with my spouse and then they returned healthy. So good and worth a share!

http://abc13.com/health/newlywed-saves-husbands-life-after-sudden-cardia...

January 21st

Despite Overall In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survival Improvement, Lower Survival on Nights, Weekends Persists

Survival difference between ‘on-hours’ and ‘off-hours’ remains unchanged

WASHINGTON, DC--Overall survival has improved for the approximately 200,000 patients experiencing in-hospital cardiac arrest in the U.S. each year, but patients who arrest during nights or weekends continue to experience lower survival compared to patients who arrest during daytime hours. Survival to discharge in patients who arrested during "off-hours" was an absolute 3.8 percent lower compared to patients who arrested during "on-hours," according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

January 19th

Robert H. Trenkamp, Jr.: An Advocate Who Made A Difference

Robert H. Trenkamp, Jr., 74, of Skidaway Island, Georgia, suffered sudden cardiac arrest at his daughter's home in Zurich, Switzerland, over the Christmas holidays. Since he was a staunch advocate for improving survival from cardiac arrest, his family was well-versed in the critical importance of CPR and the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). They immediately gave him pedal CPR and used the AED that was by his bedside. Emergency Medical Services arrived within minutes and he was life-flighted to one of the best heart hospitals in Europe, where he received state-of-the-art cardiac care.

January 18th

AI Digital Assistant Can Help Dispatchers Identify Cardiac Arrest

When someone goes into cardiac arrest outside a hospital, time is critical: The chance of survival decreases about 10 percent with each minute. The first step–recognizing that it is cardiac arrest—is challenging for emergency dispatchers who have to make sense of symptoms relayed by a panicked friend or relative.

January 13th

Without CPR and an AED, This Patriots Fan Would Have Died

Now the family is trying to find the military medic who helped save his life.

On November 26, after leaving the Patriots/ Dolphins game, my dad, Edward K. Casabian, Jr., 75, went into sudden cardiac arrest while boarding the Providence-bound train. He was with my cousin, Ed Patriquin, an obstetrician from Davis, California, and my 11-year-old son, Luke. After seeing several pre-season games over the years, this was Luke's first regular season game—something he had been angling for, for quite some time.

January 11th

Cardiac Arrest Survivors Have Trouble Returning to Work, Social Life

Tom Parker was 32 when his heart suddenly stopped. At home in Washington, D.C., his wife quickly started CPR with guidance from a 911 dispatcher. An emergency medical technician arrived on the scene minutes later. Using a portable defibrillator, he shocked Parker’s heart to get it pumping again.

January 8th

SCA Survivor

A week before Christmas in 2017 I developed extreme chest pain. I took an aspirin, a zantac in case it was indigestion and a package of alka selzer. I lost my husband two months ago and had he been there I would have sent him to the store for GasX. I was reluctant to call an ambulance because that is for really serious stuff. I had never called one before. I had been nauseas and had dry heaves twice. I think that is why I decided to call because I had heard in a CPR Class that nausea could be a symptom of a heart attack. I called 911 told them my story and they dispatched an ambulance. It seemed like it took a long time for them to get to my house. No lights no siren. They came in and one guy was hooking me up to leads and the other was sitting at my table asking me how to spell my name etc. I was irritable with him and it was hard to talk. We went out to the ambulance and he said it didn't look like anything to worry about but I could go to the hospital and get checked out.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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