Archive - 2018

Archive - 2018

June 19th

Gene Editing Technology May Improve Accuracy of Predicting Individuals’ Heart Disease Risk

Study Highlights:

June 17th

Deaths from Cardiac Arrest Are Misclassified, Overestimated

Nearly 1 in 7 Are Due to a Hidden Drug Overdose, UCSF Autopsy Study Finds

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--Forty percent of deaths attributed to cardiac arrest are not sudden or unexpected, and nearly half of the remainder are not arrhythmic – the only situation in which CPR and defibrillators are effective – according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco and the City and County of San Francisco Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

Studying Heart Disease After Death Can Help the Living

Study Highlights:
  • Autopsy findings provide valuable information about causes and natural history of overall cardiovascular disease.
  • Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis.

DALLAS, TX--Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Apple’s iOS 12 Securely and Automatically Shares Emergency Location with 911

NASHVILLE, TN--iPhone users in the United States who call 911 will be able to automatically and securely share their location data with first responders beginning later this year with iOS 12, providing faster and more accurate information to help reduce emergency response times.
 
Approximately 80 percent of 911 calls today come from mobile devices, but outdated, landline-era infrastructure often makes it difficult for 911 centers to quickly and accurately obtain a mobile caller’s location.

June 15th

All's Well That Ends Well

Shakespeare said, “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.” The Bard may have been right, but Frantzi Schaub took him a bit too literally.      

June 14th

Drowning Can Be Fast and Silent, But It Can Be Prevented, Too

Just back from a run with her husband, Laura Metro faced a parent’s worst nightmare: Her 6-year-old daughter, Maison, ran to her screaming, “I think Clay died! I think Clay died!”

Metro’s 3-year-old son, who was swimming with family friends, was found at the bottom of the pool with his towel. One friend started CPR – or the closest thing he knew based on what he’d seen on TV – on Clay’s blue, lifeless body.

Paramedics arrived and got Clay’s heart beating again. He was taken by helicopter to the hospital and spent two days in a coma before making what Metro calls “nothing short of a miraculous recovery.”

June 11th

Erectile Dysfunction Means Increased Risk for Heart Disease, Including Cardiac Arrest, Regardless of Other Risk Factors

Study Highlights:
  • Men with erectile dysfunction are at greater risk for heart attacks, cardiac arrests, strokes and sudden cardiac death.
  • New study provides strongest link to date between sexual dysfunction and cardiovascular risk.
  • Erectile dysfunction can be an important factor for physicians in gauging cardiovascular risk.
  • Men with erectile dysfunction warrant further testing and more aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors.

DALLAS, TX--Erectile dysfunction (ED) indicates greater cardiovascular risk, regardless of other risk factors, such as cholesterol, smoking and high blood pressure, according new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

June 6th

Drones May Soon Help Save People in Cardiac Arrest

Drones, the unmanned aircraft that got its start as part of the U.S. military’s arsenal and is today being used by everyone from photographers to farmers, are now heralded as a solution to a problem that’s bedeviled emergency medical personnel for years: How to deliver lifesaving defibrillators to people suffering cardiac arrest in areas not quickly reached by ambulances.

June 5th

University of Iowa Memorializes Renowned Cardiologist Richard Kerber with Lifesaving Program

Nearly everyone knows that CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)—rapid, rhythmic chest compressions—can save lives. Similarly, most people have seen AEDs (automated external defibrillators) deployed in public places such as airports and shopping malls. These devices can deliver an electric shock that restores a normal heart rate and rhythm in a person in cardiac arrest. But many people lack the basic training that would allow them to use these lifesaving techniques in an emergency. 

June 3rd

Scientists Unravel Brain Networks of Cardiac Arrest Survivors

Immediate CPR can double or triple the likelihood that a person will survive cardiac arrest, but survivors often face struggles, particularly with their brains.

Dr. Karen Hirsch, a neurologist and program director of neurocritical care at the Stanford Stroke Center, is researching how to best treat patients’ brains post-cardiac arrest. She recently completed work on a study funded by the American Heart Association in which she and a team of researchers uncovered important connections in the brain of comatose patients that might help doctors know how best to treat them.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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