Archive - Mar 2017

Archive - Mar 2017

Date
Type

March 28th

All Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Cases Should Be Transported to Cath-Lab Centers

Distance from the site of cardiac arrest to the center does not affect outcomes.

AARHUS, DENMARK -- People who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) have a better chance of survival if they are transported directly to a center with a cardiac catheterization laboratory, regardless of distance, rather than simply to the nearest hospital, according to new research conducted in Denmark.

"Their chances are better if they are admitted directly for specialized post-resuscitation care with coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), even if that center is farther away than a general hospital," said Dr. Tinne Tranberg (Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark) in an interview with heartwire from Medscape.

March 26th

Review Looks at State Requirements for AEDs in Schools

The installation of automated external defibrillators (AED) in schools is associated with increased survival after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), according to a review published March 27th in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

As state requirements for AEDs in schools in the U.S. vary widely, Mark V. Sherrid, MD, FACC, et al., used LexisNexis Academic to identify all current state statutes and regulations pertaining to AEDs in schools.

March 22nd

hello

I'm struggling to make it by, I'm 22 years old and had sudden cardiac arrest last year
(February 10th, 2016? idk the actual day but I was told either that day or the following). I spent some time in a coma, I don't actually know how many days of that either but I know it was somewhere around a week and a half. I can't help but to wish everything would've just ended. Why did someone have to save me? My life seemed to be on a good track and now everything has fallen apart. I don't have any closure, and I'm in so much debt I don't know where to begin... I was told there there wasn't a cause, it just happened. I don't remember anything about it or leading up to it happening, i don't really know where my memory stops and picks up again but I know somethings I don't have any recollection of.
I have photos and conversations on my phone that are weird to look at. Like i'm looking at my own memories but they feel like they belong to someone else.

March 21st

Coffee Shops, 24-Hour ATMs Are The Best Locations for Life-Saving AEDs, U of Toronto Research Shows

U of T Engineering team creates list of top 10 businesses where placing automatic external defibrillators would save lives

TORONTO, CA-- ATMs and coffee shops such as Tim Hortons, Starbucks and Second Cup make ideal locations for placing automated external defibrillators (AEDs), a new study says. University of Toronto Engineering researchers Associate Professor Timothy Chan and PhD student Christopher Sun, in collaboration with St. Michael’s Hospital, found that responding quickly can be the difference between life and death when someone is suffering a cardiac arrest, and that means having immediate access to a nearby AED is crucial – the chances of survival decrease by 10 per cent each minute.

March 20th

Resuscitation Champion Leaves Lifesaving Legacy

EUGENE, OR--Lane County firefighters are mourning the loss of one man who had a big impact on their lifesaving techniques.

Fire Captain Craig Aman from Seattle Firefighters Local 27 passed away last week. Captain Aman was a Eugene resident who commuted to Seattle. He worked closely with Eugene-Springfield Fire. His legacy lives on in Lane County.

Beginning in 2013, Captain Aman volunteered his time to train local firefighters on new cardiac arrest management. The modern technique is referred to as a pit-crew concept, meaning it's consistent and fast paced.

Captain Aman died in the line of duty from kidney cancer, which is among the long list of cancers that affect firefighters.

Debate: Necessity of ECG Screenings in Young Athletes Still Uncertain

WASHINGTON, D.C.--While ECG screenings in school-age athletes may be necessary to reduce risk for sudden cardiac death, there are questions that need to be answered about accuracy of diagnosis, two experts said in a debate held at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Michigan Medicine Launches Study of Life-Saving Resuscitation Treatment for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

ANN ARBOR, MI -- Even when rapidly treated, less than 10 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims survive, according to the American Heart Association. That’s why Michigan Medicine is launching a new study to examine the potential benefit of a life-saving resuscitation strategy for sudden cardiac arrest.

Sudden cardiac arrest is a life-threatening condition in which the heart suddenly stops beating and blood stops flowing to the brain and other organs within the body.

March 16th

Moderate Exercise May Be Beneficial for HCM Patients

Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are urged to take it easy. But new research shows they might benefit from moderate aerobic exercise.

As one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in young people, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can push patients into sedentary lifestyles. Current guidelines recommend people with HCM, the most common genetic cardiovascular disease, limit intense exercise because of concerns over triggering ventricular arrhythmias. But new Michigan Medicine research finds there may be reason to re-evaluate the guidelines.

Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates CPR and AED Use in Real Cardiac Arrests

An international team of researchers recently investigated factors that encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, was conducted from 2012-2015 in Denmark. They found that several factors, other than previous hands‐on CPR training, facilitate lay bystander instigation of CPR and AED use. Recognition and modification of these factors may increase lay bystander CPR rates and patient survival following out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest.

These factors include:

Can Drones Deliver Emergency Defibrillators?

A drone network could be deployed to speed defibrillators to bystanders trying to help people in cardiac arrest, getting the devices to the patient faster than emergency services, a recent Canadian study suggests.

Researchers examined historical data on 53,702 cardiac arrests over 26,851 square kilometers (10,367 square miles) of rural and urban regions surrounding Toronto, Ontario, to see how drones might be deployed to get help to cardiac arrest patients more quickly than typical 911 response times.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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