Archive - Nov 2017

Archive - Nov 2017

Date
Type

November 30th

BEST FIRST RESPONSE: PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER

A couple of heart-related local news stories came up the other day and I was struck again by the importance of AED’s and the factors that come into play in determining whether or not an SCA crisis has the best possible outcome. Usually it seems that most of life “out there in the big world” is beyond our control, but there are some crucial pieces of the emergency response puzzle that make a huge difference in life or death outcomes of SCA events. Working individually and with our communities, we can take concrete steps to improve survival rates for SCA right where we live!

A TRAINED FIRST RESPONDER

November 28th

Survivors and Families Invited to Participate in Facilitated Discussion in Hospitality Suite During ECCU 2017

PITTSBURGH, PA--A hallmark of the Citizen CPR Foundation’s Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update (ECCU) conference, scheduled for December 5-8 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans is a track devoted to sudden cardiac arrest survivors, family members, and rescuers.

Giving Tuesday: Why Giving to Others Makes us Feel Good

CLEVELAND, OH--The Tuesday after Thanksgiving is designated as ‘Giving Tuesday’ – a day earmarked for doing for others or donating to charitable causes.

And while we might think that giving only benefits the recipient of the gift, according to Joseph Rock PsyD, of Cleveland Clinic, that’s not entirely the case.

He said our brains experience joy when we are the giver too.

“Part of your brain gets activated when you do charitable giving or engage in altruistic behavior, so we really do receive biochemical, physical pleasure from doing things for other people,” said Dr. Rock.

November 19th

State of CPR Education in U.S. High Schools

Despite majority of U.S. states requiring CPR training, wide variability exists

WASHINGTON, DC--Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is known to improve survival of cardiac arrest; however, there is a disparate geographic variation in cardiac arrest survival and only a small number of the U.S. population is trained in CPR annually. According to the Institute for Medicine (IOM), high school students may be an excellent target for CPR training. A review published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that over half of U.S. states require some form of CPR training in high school, but there is wide variability in instruction.

High Blood Pressure Redefined for First Time in 14 Years: 130 is the New High

Highlights

November 15th

CHOP Research Scientist Honored with American Heart Association Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr. Vinay Nadkarni recognized for his lifetime contributions to cardiac arrest resuscitation science

November 14th

Screening Programs Are Unlikely to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Arrest Among Competitive Athletes, New Study Suggests

TORONTO, ONTARIO--Screening programs for cardiac conditions are not an effective way to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive sport, and may prevent healthy athletes from participating, a new study suggests.

More than 80 per cent sudden cardiac arrests in competitive sports could not have been predicted by screening programs, according to the study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital identified a total of 3,825 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests among persons aged 12-45 during the six-year study period.

November 13th

Sixth-Graders Can Learn, Perform Hands-Only CPR

ANAHEIM, CA--Students as young as sixth-graders can learn and perform CPR effectively and should be targeted for training, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers assessed the ability of 160 sixth-graders (average age 12) to perform Hands-Only CPR for adults, using music and a video game to help the students attain the correct compression rate.

November 12th

Driving a Tesla May Not Trip Your Defibrillator

ANAHEIM, CA--Sitting in, or standing close to the charging port of a Tesla electric vehicle didn’t trigger a shock or interfere with implantable defibrillator performance, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers examined the potential effect of electromagnetic interference while charging an electric vehicle battery at 220 Volts. The study included 26 men and 8 women from Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, average age 69, with implanted cardiac defibrillators of various types.

AHA President Doing Well After Minor Heart Attack

ANAHEIM, CA--American Heart Association President John Warner was away from the AHA’s Scientific Sessions with his family Monday after having a minor heart attack during the organization’s flagship scientific conference.

Warner, a practicing cardiologist and the CEO of UT Southwestern University Hospitals in Dallas, had the episode Monday morning. He was taken to a local hospital, where doctors inserted a stent to open a clogged artery.

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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