Archive - Nov 2012

Archive - Nov 2012

November 25th

Preventative Screening for Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes Debated

Authors disagree on real cost of screening

While ensuring the safety of high school and college athletes is hardly controversial, the method and associated costs of doing so are hotly debated. Conducting electrocardiographic (ECG) screenings of all young competitive athletes in the United States would cost up to $69 billion over 20 years and save about 4,813 lives, making the cost per life saved over $10 million, according to a study published online today in theJournal of the American College of Cardiology.

Atrial Fibrillation Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

Atrial fibrillation may raise the risk of sudden cardiac death, according to findings from two large population-based cohorts, according to a report in MedPage Today.

The risk of sudden cardiac death was elevated 3.26-fold with incident atrial fibrillation in multivariate analysis of the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, Lin Y. Chen, MD, MS, of the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis, and colleagues found.

And the risk was 2.14 times higher after onset of Afib in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), the group reported online in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

If confirmed, the sudden cardiac death finding "adds to our evolving understanding that Afib is not a benign condition," they wrote.

November 20th

Sudden Death Risk Higher in Black Women

Researchers have determined that postmenopausal women have specific independent risk factors that drive their incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and being African American is one of them.

African-American women had a significant 61% increased risk of SCD compared with other races, after all known risk factors and sociodemographic risk factors were accounted for, according to Monica L. Bertoia, MPH, PhD, of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

Of the 418 women who experienced SCD, investigators identified these characteristics, in addition to traditional risk factors, that put them at increased risk:

Caught on Camera: Woman Goes Into Cardiac Arrest During Traffic Stop

ENCINO (CBS2) — A video taken by the California Highway Patrol may be the first time a camera has captured all of the events leading up to a cardiac arrest following the use of a TASER® electronic control device.

On June 4, CHP officers stopped to check on the welfare of 50-year-old Angela Jones after finding her sitting in a parked vehicle on Haskell Avenue, near the Ventura (101) Freeway.

A camera mounted on the officers’ car captured the incident.

“How much have you had to drink tonight?” an officer asked the Studio City resident.

“Nothing,” Jones said.

“Nothing?” the officer responded. “What about medication or drugs?”

Officers questioned Jones for 15 minutes, suspecting she might be under the influence, and then asked to look through her purse.

November 19th

Shift happens

Last week I drove to NY to see my old buddy Dr Rubin, electrophysiologist supremo. He's just the best darn doctor I've ever had the pleasure to be a patient of. Well, it turns out that that I finally made some use of my ICD (Medtronic Virtuoso). It's the second ICD I've had - it replaced the first one after its battery was running dry. I had this one implanted in July 2010 and it has a new feature called ATP (Anti Tachycardia Pacing) which is pain free therapy that is delivered if the device detects a VT.

On July 17 and October 20, the device did just that. Both times I was in a stressful situation (giving an important talk with an audience). And both times though I knew I was nervous (lots of palpitations), I did not, repeat, not, notice that the device operated. I'm very thankful for this ATP thing which supposedly can stop VF from occurring.

November 18th

Bakersfield, CA, High School Student Collapses and Dies from SCA

Bakersville, CA--A 15-year-old boy collapsed and died during a physical education class at Centennial High School.

Caleb Hannink died at 2:28 p.m. Thursday, according to the Kern County Coroner's Office.

The school called an ambulance immediately and it arrived within five minutes, but the boy died after he was taken to Bakersfield Heart Hospital, according to Kern High School District spokesman John Teves.

Grief counselors were on campus Friday, he said.

"He was a good kid," Teves said. "He was well-liked. They're having a tough time. We're trying to help them the best we can."

SOURCE: The Bakersfield Californian

FDA Considers Reclassification of AEDs

By Teresa McCallion, EMT-B, Journal of Emergency Medical Services

Expert panel recommends higher safety standards

Blood pressures are rising over a move by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to classify automated external defibrillators (AEDs) as a Class III high-risk medical device, requiring a more rigorous pre-market approval (PMA) application process. The FDA is expected to make a final decision by the end of this year.

November 15th

After Coach Nearly Dies, Students Learn CPR

BELLE PLAINE, Minn. – By 2014, all children in public schools in Minnesota will be required to have a class in CPR.

But, after a big scare at Belle Plaine Junior/Senior High School earlier this year, students there are already learning how to save lives.

On Friday morning, just about 500 high schoolers took part in a CPR/AED course put on by the Belle Plaine Fire and Police Department, as well as the Ridgeview Medical Center.

At first, it looked like a strange dance. Hundreds of kids yelling, and their bodies moving to the beat of “Stayin’ Alive.”

That’s the beat that’s now used to do CPR and the beat that helped save teacher and football coach Ken Wick’s life.

The last thing Wick remembers from Sept. 11, 2012 is heading to his seventh grade football practice. He had been watching warm-ups when another coach told him he went down.

Do People Turn to Twitter to Learn CPR Info?

Amid snarky comments and links to cat videos, some Twitter users turn to the social network to find and post information on cardiac arrest and CPR, according to a new study.

Over a month, researchers found 15,324 messages - known as tweets - on Twitter that included specific information about resuscitation and cardiac arrest.

"From a science standpoint, we wanted to know if we can reliably find information on a public health topic, or is (Twitter) just a place where people describe what they ate that day," said the study's lead author Dr. Raina M. Merchant.

According to the researchers, they did find some people using Twitter to send and receive a wide variety of information on CPR and cardiac arrest, including their personal experiences, questions and current events.

November 14th

Patients More Likely to Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Today

A new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that survival in patients who experience a cardiac arrest in the hospital has increased significantly over the past decade. The study, led by cardiologists at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute and the University of Missouri in Kansas City, also shows that this improvement has been accompanied by lower rates of neurological disability among those who survive.

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The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The vision of the SCA Foundation is to increase awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and influence attitudinal and behavioral changes that will reduce mortality and morbidity from SCA.

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