To save one life is as if to save the world.

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April 21st, 2014

28-Year-Old Cardiac Arrest Survivor Meets EMS Personnel Who Helped Save Him

LOS ANGELES, CA--A man who nearly died when he got overheated during the Los Angeles Marathon said during an emotional reunion with his rescuers today that he feels like the luckiest person in the world to be alive.

Jode Lebeda, 28, was running the 2014 ASICS LA Marathon March 9 when he went into cardiac arrest at mile 20 in West Los Angeles, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Lebeda, who was running the race to check off an item on his bucket list, said he nearly died.

"Going down where I went down and having that immediate support -- within 60 seconds I had able, capable hands working on me to revive me," Lebeda said. "One hundred feet one way or the other, and I wouldn't be here today."

He thanked the number of paramedics and the medical team that saved his life.

"It makes you want to go buy a lottery ticket almost," Lebeda said.

28-Year-Old who Suffered Heart Attack at L.A. Marathon Meets Rescuers

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A man who nearly died when he got overheated during the Los Angeles Marathon said during an emotional reunion with his rescuers today that he feels like the luckiest person in the world to be alive.

Jode Lebeda, 28, was running the 2014 ASICS LA Marathon March 9 when he went into cardiac arrest at mile 20 in West Los Angeles, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Lebeda, who was running the race to check off an item on his bucket list, said he nearly died.

"Going down where I went down and having that immediate support -- within 60 seconds I had able, capable hands working on me to revive me," Lebeda said. "One hundred feet one way or the other, and I wouldn't be here today."

He thanked the number of paramedics and the medical team that saved his life.

"It makes you want to go buy a lottery ticket almost," Lebeda said.

Dr. Paul Vespa, director of UCLA Medical Center's Neurointensive Care Unit, said Lebeda had been close to dying.

April 17th

Racing Death: How Can Runners Be Saved from Cardiac Arrest?

Last Sunday, the Rock ’n’ Roll half marathon in Raleigh, N.C., experienced a very rare – and very tragic – event.

Two male runners, both in their 30s, collapsed before reaching the finish line and were pronounced dead at nearby hospitals. The causes of their deaths have not been confirmed, but health experts at the race speculated that they experienced fatal cardiac events.

Cardiac arrests during long-distance races are very rare. According to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, nearly 11 million runners participated in marathons and half-marathons in the United States between 2000 and 2010, and only 59 had cardiac events.

But when cardiac arrests do occur, they are almost always deadly. Of the 59 cases reported in the study, 42 were fatal.

So what can be done to prevent these tragedies? Should race organizers be stricter with their registration requirements?

April 16th

Public Health Burden of Sudden Cardiac Death in the United States

LOS ANGELES, CA--Sumeet Chugh and colleages from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have analyzed multiple data sources to determine the relative health burden of premature death from sudden cardiac arrest compared with other diseases in the United States. They reviewed:

April 15th

Local EMT Saves Same Man Twice While Off-Duty

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SANTA CLARITA (CBSLA.com) — An emergency medical technician saved the same man on two occasions while he was off the job.

About six months ago, Tyler Rosser said he was playing softball when a player on a nearby field collapsed in cardiac arrest.

Rosser gave the man CPR and used a portable defibrillator to try and jump-start his heart.

“Within a couple minutes, he regained a pulse and was breathing on his own,” he said.

CBS2’s Adrianna Weingold reported that two days ago, the same man’s heart stopped beating for a second time.

Rosser was there once again.

“Not just once, but for someone to come back twice, I just feel blessed to have that opportunity to be able to make an impact like that,” he said.

Rosser said he’s amazed he was in the right place at the right time two times.

“I couldn’t believe it because he’s been playing softball every Sunday since then and who knows how many games he’s played and I haven’t see him,” he said.

April 14th

Why Do Healthy People Die Running Marathons?

You’ve likely read the sad news from this weekend in the world of distance running: Three relatively young men died on Sunday while running in otherwise festive, long-distance races in London and Raleigh, North Carolina.

At the 34th London Marathon, where 36,000 runners participated on Sunday, the post-race death of a 42-year-old man was the event’s second death in three years. In North Carolina, two men died, age 31 and 35, after collapsing at or near the end of the 13.1-mile, half-marathon of the capital city’s inaugural Rock ‘N’ Roll Marathon. A combined 12,500 runners participated in the Raleigh events.

Two Runners Die Near Finish Line of Half Marathon in North Carolina

RALEIGH, NC--Two runners who died Sunday morning as participants in the Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon may fit the profile of the most common fatalities in such events, according to a Duke sports medicine specialist: men in their 30s with pre-existing, undiagnosed cardiac abnormalities.

Saying the runners’ families wanted privacy, race organizers did not release the names of the men who died or give any indication of their causes of death.

“We regret to confirm that two participants passed away at today’s half-marathon,” said Dr. P.Z. Pearce, the event’s medical director. “We are greatly saddened by these tragic losses, and our prayers go out to the each of the runners’ family and friends.”

April 13th

London Marathon Runner Who Died Named as Robert Berry

LONDON--A man who died after collapsing at the finish line of the London Marathon has been named as 42-year-old Robert Berry.

Organizer Virgin Money said he was taken to one of its medical facilities where he was treated by four consultants, including one specializing in emergency medicine.

Mr Berry, from Newbury in Berkshire, was pronounced dead after being transferred to St Mary's Hospital.

About 36,000 people took part in the event on Sunday.

A statement from the organizer said: "It is with regret that we can now confirm that Mr. Robert Berry, aged 42, collapsed at the finish of the London Marathon.

April 12th

Memory Loss

EbonyChief's picture

My wife is hospitalized now after having SCA. They could not find a pulse for 20 minutes after a routine endoscopy. She is still in ICU now. It has only been a little over a week and a half but she is now starting to slowly respond and notice people in the room. At first she seem to not recognize me. But we see progress now. I am so grateful for this website that has given me hope for a better future. I will keep you posted to her progress and recover.

April 8th

Painkillers Linked to Heightened Irregular Heartbeat Risk in Older Adults

Underlying factors behind this association warrant further attention, say authors

Current and recent use of painkillers/anti-inflammatories may be linked to a heightened risk of an irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation) among older adults, finds a large population study published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Atrial fibrillation has itself been linked to stroke, heart failure, and reduced life expectancy, while previously published research has linked the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, to a heightened risk of cardiovascular problems, including heart attack.